2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154570
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Surviving Childhood and Adolescent Cancer on the Family
Abstract:
The Impact of Surviving Childhood and Adolescent Cancer on the Family
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Neville, Kathleen L., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Kean University
Title:Professor, Department of Nursing
Objective: To explore the impact of surviving childhood and adolescent cancer on the family unit. Design: Descriptive qualitative. Sample: Through a snowball sampling technique, data were obtained from volunteer participants consisting of families with a child who has survived childhood or adolescent cancer. Methods: Intensive, unstructured interviews by one researcher were conducted in families homes to gain an understanding of the cancer experience for the entire family. Family members were interviewed individually and collectively during one in-depth interview session. Constant comparision analyses was used to identify emergent themes. Findings: This analysis indicated five themes in families of a childhood/adolescent cancer survivor: Increased maternal affiliation, uncertainty, resilience, posttraumatic stress, and discrepant parental responses to a life-threatening illness. Conclusions: The trauma of having a child survive cancer represents a life-changing experience for the entire family. Cancer-related fears and uncertainties exist long afer the cessation of treatment, and dramatically impacts on family life. Addressing the psychosocial needs of survivors and their family members should be a component of their health care long after treatment ends. Implications: Although time-consuming and difficult, further research to gain additional knowledge regarding family responses, and in particular, parental responses to the experience of a life-threatening illness is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Surviving Childhood and Adolescent Cancer on the Familyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154570-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact of Surviving Childhood and Adolescent Cancer on the Family</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Neville, Kathleen L., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kean University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor, Department of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kneville@kean.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To explore the impact of surviving childhood and adolescent cancer on the family unit. Design: Descriptive qualitative. Sample: Through a snowball sampling technique, data were obtained from volunteer participants consisting of families with a child who has survived childhood or adolescent cancer. Methods: Intensive, unstructured interviews by one researcher were conducted in families homes to gain an understanding of the cancer experience for the entire family. Family members were interviewed individually and collectively during one in-depth interview session. Constant comparision analyses was used to identify emergent themes. Findings: This analysis indicated five themes in families of a childhood/adolescent cancer survivor: Increased maternal affiliation, uncertainty, resilience, posttraumatic stress, and discrepant parental responses to a life-threatening illness. Conclusions: The trauma of having a child survive cancer represents a life-changing experience for the entire family. Cancer-related fears and uncertainties exist long afer the cessation of treatment, and dramatically impacts on family life. Addressing the psychosocial needs of survivors and their family members should be a component of their health care long after treatment ends. Implications: Although time-consuming and difficult, further research to gain additional knowledge regarding family responses, and in particular, parental responses to the experience of a life-threatening illness is warranted.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:06:15Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:06:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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