2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154579
Type:
Presentation
Title:
We Are Mothers,. Too: A Critical Ethnography With Lesbian Birth Families
Abstract:
We Are Mothers,. Too: A Critical Ethnography With Lesbian Birth Families
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Renaud, Michelle, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Duke University
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing
This study was designed to describe lesbians’ personal and health care experiences regarding becoming pregnant, giving birth, and being mothers and co-mothers within the context of family. Other goals were to describe how power relations and structures support social injustice and address future policy changes based on the findings. Data were collected from 11 lesbian couples and 1 single mother using in-depth interviews. Additional data collection methods were participant observation at a lesbian mother support group and researcher-conducted focus group. Applied critical ethnography revealed seven organizing themes: Preparing the Way: Becoming Ready; Conception: You Can’t Just Fall Into It; You Can Hear A Heartbeat: Pregnancy; Birthing Our Babies; The Work of Mothers, and Mothers Who Work; Families Who Sustain and Families Who Oppose; and Sources of Support In Everyday Life. Continual analysis of field notes and audiotape recordings from a critical perspective revealed socially constructed dominant discourses: We’re Used to Normal Families; If There’s a Baby, There Has to be a Father Someplace; Suffer the Little Children; You’re Not the Baby’s Mother; and Discomfort with Difference. Mothers in this research navigated, challenged, and circumvented normative discourses by The Buffer Zone, Solidarity and Support, Providing For The Child and Seeking Tolerant Health Care. The findings of this research provide information about lesbian mothers’ experiences of pregnancy, birth and early parenting, and the ways that society portrays mothers in a primarily heterosexual model. The knowledge created from this research will be used to inform health care providers, policy makers, and the general public about the specific needs, concerns, and experiences of lesbian mothers who biologically have a baby.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWe Are Mothers,. Too: A Critical Ethnography With Lesbian Birth Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154579-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">We Are Mothers,. Too: A Critical Ethnography With Lesbian Birth Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Renaud, Michelle, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Duke University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">renau001@mc.duke.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study was designed to describe lesbians&rsquo; personal and health care experiences regarding becoming pregnant, giving birth, and being mothers and co-mothers within the context of family. Other goals were to describe how power relations and structures support social injustice and address future policy changes based on the findings. Data were collected from 11 lesbian couples and 1 single mother using in-depth interviews. Additional data collection methods were participant observation at a lesbian mother support group and researcher-conducted focus group. Applied critical ethnography revealed seven organizing themes: Preparing the Way: Becoming Ready; Conception: You Can&rsquo;t Just Fall Into It; You Can Hear A Heartbeat: Pregnancy; Birthing Our Babies; The Work of Mothers, and Mothers Who Work; Families Who Sustain and Families Who Oppose; and Sources of Support In Everyday Life. Continual analysis of field notes and audiotape recordings from a critical perspective revealed socially constructed dominant discourses: We&rsquo;re Used to Normal Families; If There&rsquo;s a Baby, There Has to be a Father Someplace; Suffer the Little Children; You&rsquo;re Not the Baby&rsquo;s Mother; and Discomfort with Difference. Mothers in this research navigated, challenged, and circumvented normative discourses by The Buffer Zone, Solidarity and Support, Providing For The Child and Seeking Tolerant Health Care. The findings of this research provide information about lesbian mothers&rsquo; experiences of pregnancy, birth and early parenting, and the ways that society portrays mothers in a primarily heterosexual model. The knowledge created from this research will be used to inform health care providers, policy makers, and the general public about the specific needs, concerns, and experiences of lesbian mothers who biologically have a baby.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:06:40Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:06:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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