Mindfulness Meditation's Effect on Preceived Stress, Tension Headaches, and Secretory Immunoglobulin A in Saliva (sIgA)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154581
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mindfulness Meditation's Effect on Preceived Stress, Tension Headaches, and Secretory Immunoglobulin A in Saliva (sIgA)
Abstract:
Mindfulness Meditation's Effect on Preceived Stress, Tension Headaches, and Secretory Immunoglobulin A in Saliva (sIgA)
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Rosdahl, Dana R., PhD, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Objective: The objective of this study was to test a nonpharmacologic intervention, mindfulness meditation, on perceived stress, tension headache relief, and secretory immunoglobulin A in saliva (sIgA). Design: A mixed pre-/post-experimental design with pre-/post-longitudinal measurements was used to examine the research questions. Population and Sample: Sixty-four adults with tension headaches were recruited from the Southwestern United States. The sample consisted of 50 women and 14 men with tension headaches, aged 18–70; 34 were randomly assigned to an intervention group and 30 to a comparison group. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Intervention participants received 8-weeks of mindfulness meditation, 2 hours a week. Comparison participants received an 8-week educational class in headaches, 1½ hours a week. Three research questions examined: (1) Are there differences in the eight study variables (perceived stress, sIgA, and tension headache intensity and duration) between the intervention and comparison groups? (2) What combination of variables best explains sIgA and tension headache intensity and duration? (3) How do group, gender, payment, and religious background affect changes in headache intensity and duration over time? Methods: The analysis used ANCOVA, multiple regression, and growth curve analysis to answer research questions. Findings: Analysis results indicated that (1) the intervention group had a significantly higher post-treatment sIgA level than the comparison group; (2) with both groups, 62% of the explained variance in headache duration post-test was explained by its pre-test, sIgA pre-test, and stress post-test; (3) group, gender, payment, or religious background did not relate to a significant decrease in headache symptoms in either group. Conclusions: The intervention of mindfulness meditation affected an increase in sIgA level, and did not cause significant changes in perceived stress or tension headaches. Implications: Advanced practice nurses can teach their patients mindfulness meditation to enhanced immune function and possibly decrease stress-related symptoms, such as headache pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMindfulness Meditation's Effect on Preceived Stress, Tension Headaches, and Secretory Immunoglobulin A in Saliva (sIgA)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154581-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mindfulness Meditation's Effect on Preceived Stress, Tension Headaches, and Secretory Immunoglobulin A in Saliva (sIgA)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rosdahl, Dana R., PhD, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">drosdahl@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of this study was to test a nonpharmacologic intervention, mindfulness meditation, on perceived stress, tension headache relief, and secretory immunoglobulin A in saliva (sIgA). Design: A mixed pre-/post-experimental design with pre-/post-longitudinal measurements was used to examine the research questions. Population and Sample: Sixty-four adults with tension headaches were recruited from the Southwestern United States. The sample consisted of 50 women and 14 men with tension headaches, aged 18&ndash;70; 34 were randomly assigned to an intervention group and 30 to a comparison group. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Intervention participants received 8-weeks of mindfulness meditation, 2 hours a week. Comparison participants received an 8-week educational class in headaches, 1&frac12; hours a week. Three research questions examined: (1) Are there differences in the eight study variables (perceived stress, sIgA, and tension headache intensity and duration) between the intervention and comparison groups? (2) What combination of variables best explains sIgA and tension headache intensity and duration? (3) How do group, gender, payment, and religious background affect changes in headache intensity and duration over time? Methods: The analysis used ANCOVA, multiple regression, and growth curve analysis to answer research questions. Findings: Analysis results indicated that (1) the intervention group had a significantly higher post-treatment sIgA level than the comparison group; (2) with both groups, 62% of the explained variance in headache duration post-test was explained by its pre-test, sIgA pre-test, and stress post-test; (3) group, gender, payment, or religious background did not relate to a significant decrease in headache symptoms in either group. Conclusions: The intervention of mindfulness meditation affected an increase in sIgA level, and did not cause significant changes in perceived stress or tension headaches. Implications: Advanced practice nurses can teach their patients mindfulness meditation to enhanced immune function and possibly decrease stress-related symptoms, such as headache pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:06:45Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:06:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.