A New Concept in Dementia: Becoming Lost in the Community and Its Deadly Consequences

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154582
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A New Concept in Dementia: Becoming Lost in the Community and Its Deadly Consequences
Abstract:
A New Concept in Dementia: Becoming Lost in the Community and Its Deadly Consequences
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Rowe, Meredeth A., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Florida
Title:associate professor
The purposes of this paper are to: 1) describe the causes and consequences of persons with dementia (PWDs) becoming lost in the community and 2) determine the differences between those found alive versus dead in order to identify more effective search strategies. Two retrospective descriptive studies were conducted. In study 1, ~500 reports of PWDs found through the Safe Return program from 1998-99 were reviewed. In study 2, newspaper reports of lost PWDs found dead were reviewed. In study 1, accounts of persons found alive clearly indicate that becoming lost is a completely unpredictable event. A PWD who has never left the caregiver before can inexplicably leave and become lost. Becoming lost was found to occur more frequently in certain situations: during attended outings, after agitated behavior, when the caregiver was distracted / asleep, when on a normal outing alone but unable to return home. PWDs were typically found within 24 hours in a 5 mile radius of the place last seen. The second study focused on those found dead. Eighty-seven percent were found dead in secluded, unpopulated, natural areas such as woods, fields, ditches, and bodies of water. Individuals were generally found close (<1 mile) from where they left, but often were not found for extended periods. Males and persons from community-based residential facilities appear to be at higher risk of dying after leaving unattended than do females and those living at home. Conclusions: PWDs who die after becoming lost because they secluded themselves in unpopulated, natural areas making them very difficult to find. Searchers need to be cognizant of this tendency and plan searches accordingly to prevent deaths. Nurses can assist local agencies in devising plans that include areas and strategies of the search. Caregivers must be given information about Safe Return-type programs and assistance with registration.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA New Concept in Dementia: Becoming Lost in the Community and Its Deadly Consequencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154582-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A New Concept in Dementia: Becoming Lost in the Community and Its Deadly Consequences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rowe, Meredeth A., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">associate professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mrowe@nursing.ufl.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purposes of this paper are to: 1) describe the causes and consequences of persons with dementia (PWDs) becoming lost in the community and 2) determine the differences between those found alive versus dead in order to identify more effective search strategies. Two retrospective descriptive studies were conducted. In study 1, ~500 reports of PWDs found through the Safe Return program from 1998-99 were reviewed. In study 2, newspaper reports of lost PWDs found dead were reviewed. In study 1, accounts of persons found alive clearly indicate that becoming lost is a completely unpredictable event. A PWD who has never left the caregiver before can inexplicably leave and become lost. Becoming lost was found to occur more frequently in certain situations: during attended outings, after agitated behavior, when the caregiver was distracted / asleep, when on a normal outing alone but unable to return home. PWDs were typically found within 24 hours in a 5 mile radius of the place last seen. The second study focused on those found dead. Eighty-seven percent were found dead in secluded, unpopulated, natural areas such as woods, fields, ditches, and bodies of water. Individuals were generally found close (&lt;1 mile) from where they left, but often were not found for extended periods. Males and persons from community-based residential facilities appear to be at higher risk of dying after leaving unattended than do females and those living at home. Conclusions: PWDs who die after becoming lost because they secluded themselves in unpopulated, natural areas making them very difficult to find. Searchers need to be cognizant of this tendency and plan searches accordingly to prevent deaths. Nurses can assist local agencies in devising plans that include areas and strategies of the search. Caregivers must be given information about Safe Return-type programs and assistance with registration.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:06:48Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:06:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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