The Efficacy of Primary Care Nurses' Patient Education About Fecal Occult Blood Testing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154588
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Efficacy of Primary Care Nurses' Patient Education About Fecal Occult Blood Testing
Abstract:
The Efficacy of Primary Care Nurses' Patient Education About Fecal Occult Blood Testing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Stokamer, Charlene, MPH, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:VA New York Harbor Healthcare System
Title:Patient Health Education Coordinator
Objective: The objective of this study was to establish whether intensive teaching about fecal occult blood tests (FOBT) resulted in more FOBT card returns than standard teaching methods. Design: Randomized study Population: A racially diverse group of US Veterans attending primary care clinic in New York City. Variables: Two different teaching methods and their effect on FOBT card returns Method: Two teaching methods, random concealed allocation, were distributed to primary care nurses in batches of 200.The nurses opened the envelopes in numerical order and taught the assigned methotd to 790 consecutive patients referred to them for FOBT teaching. Findings: Patients receiving intensive teaching were significantly more likely to return the FOBT cards than those receiving standard teaching. Conclusion: Intensive, detailed patient education about how to collect stool samples for FOBT is more efficacious than standard teaching methods. Implication: The time nurses spend teaching patients can improve outcomes. However in this study teaching styles were not taken into account and each outcomes related to each nurse's teaching were considered.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Efficacy of Primary Care Nurses' Patient Education About Fecal Occult Blood Testingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154588-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Efficacy of Primary Care Nurses' Patient Education About Fecal Occult Blood Testing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stokamer, Charlene, MPH, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">VA New York Harbor Healthcare System</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Patient Health Education Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">char52@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of this study was to establish whether intensive teaching about fecal occult blood tests (FOBT) resulted in more FOBT card returns than standard teaching methods. Design: Randomized study Population: A racially diverse group of US Veterans attending primary care clinic in New York City. Variables: Two different teaching methods and their effect on FOBT card returns Method: Two teaching methods, random concealed allocation, were distributed to primary care nurses in batches of 200.The nurses opened the envelopes in numerical order and taught the assigned methotd to 790 consecutive patients referred to them for FOBT teaching. Findings: Patients receiving intensive teaching were significantly more likely to return the FOBT cards than those receiving standard teaching. Conclusion: Intensive, detailed patient education about how to collect stool samples for FOBT is more efficacious than standard teaching methods. Implication: The time nurses spend teaching patients can improve outcomes. However in this study teaching styles were not taken into account and each outcomes related to each nurse's teaching were considered.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:07:06Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:07:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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