Measuring Resilience: Thinking of or Thinking Through the Use of a Quantitative Instrument

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154591
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Resilience: Thinking of or Thinking Through the Use of a Quantitative Instrument
Abstract:
Measuring Resilience: Thinking of or Thinking Through the Use of a Quantitative Instrument
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Tusaie, Kathleen, PhD, RNCS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Assistant Professor/ Advanced Practice Nurse
Measuring resilience: Thinking of or thinking through the use of a quantitative instrument Object/Design: The study of resilience has moved from qualitative exploratory studies and descriptive statistics to model building and quantitative instruments. When applied appropriately, these instruments can provide significant assistance in the expansion of knowledge related to resilience. Although paradigms for new instrument development are well known and accepted, precautions required for “borrowing” instruments must also be considered. Careful attention to the congruence of the conceptual underpinnings of the study and the instrument is the most basic step prior to “borrowing” an instrument. This presentation will provide a method of diagrammatic thinking to link the theoretical/conceptual realm with the observable one. Population/Sample: The nomological validity of the Resilience Attitude Scale (RAS)(Biscoe & Harris, 1994) was diagrammed and then administered to a small, convenience sample of adult women who were participating in a therapy group for healing from sexual abuse. Concept/variable: Resilience is the ability to transform adversity into a growth experience. However, there are many inconsistencies and controversies in the literature around defining resilience. Methods/Findings: The nomological network (Cronbach & Meehl, 1995) was used.There was only partial congruence between the RAS and the conceptual framework of the study. Conclusions/Implications: To measure resilience, outcome as well as attitudinal measurement was required. Because creating a nomological network requires a specific theoretic pattern, it requires one to think specifically about the concepts underpinning our empirical work. This initial step when considering the use of a “borrowed” instrument holds the potential to add conceptual clarity to the study of resilience. Learning objectives: 1. Describe the use of diagrammatic thinking to establish nomological validity. 2. Understand the significance of identifying theoretical concepts underpinning empirical research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Resilience: Thinking of or Thinking Through the Use of a Quantitative Instrumenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154591-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measuring Resilience: Thinking of or Thinking Through the Use of a Quantitative Instrument</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tusaie, Kathleen, PhD, RNCS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor/ Advanced Practice Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ktusaie@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Measuring resilience: Thinking of or thinking through the use of a quantitative instrument Object/Design: The study of resilience has moved from qualitative exploratory studies and descriptive statistics to model building and quantitative instruments. When applied appropriately, these instruments can provide significant assistance in the expansion of knowledge related to resilience. Although paradigms for new instrument development are well known and accepted, precautions required for &ldquo;borrowing&rdquo; instruments must also be considered. Careful attention to the congruence of the conceptual underpinnings of the study and the instrument is the most basic step prior to &ldquo;borrowing&rdquo; an instrument. This presentation will provide a method of diagrammatic thinking to link the theoretical/conceptual realm with the observable one. Population/Sample: The nomological validity of the Resilience Attitude Scale (RAS)(Biscoe &amp; Harris, 1994) was diagrammed and then administered to a small, convenience sample of adult women who were participating in a therapy group for healing from sexual abuse. Concept/variable: Resilience is the ability to transform adversity into a growth experience. However, there are many inconsistencies and controversies in the literature around defining resilience. Methods/Findings: The nomological network (Cronbach &amp; Meehl, 1995) was used.There was only partial congruence between the RAS and the conceptual framework of the study. Conclusions/Implications: To measure resilience, outcome as well as attitudinal measurement was required. Because creating a nomological network requires a specific theoretic pattern, it requires one to think specifically about the concepts underpinning our empirical work. This initial step when considering the use of a &ldquo;borrowed&rdquo; instrument holds the potential to add conceptual clarity to the study of resilience. Learning objectives: 1. Describe the use of diagrammatic thinking to establish nomological validity. 2. Understand the significance of identifying theoretical concepts underpinning empirical research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:07:16Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:07:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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