2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154604
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Symptoms of Unstable Angina in Patients With and Without Diabetes
Abstract:
The Symptoms of Unstable Angina in Patients With and Without Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 21, 2004
Author:DeVon, Holli A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Co-Authors:Sue M. Penckofer, PhD, RN; Julie Johnson Zerwic, PhD, RN
ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE- It is well established that patients with diabetes experience peripheral parathesias and autonomic dysfunction which may affect the way they perceive the symptoms of unstable angina (UA). The purpose of this study was to examine differences in symptoms for patients with and without diabetes during an episode of UA. Specific aims were to determine if there were differences between the two groups in: 1) the symptoms of unstable angina; 2) the location of pain; 3) the quality of pain; and 4) the severity of chest pain and the worst symptom experienced. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- This descriptive study used structured instruments to identify the type, location, and quality of the symptoms of UA. A convenience sample of 50 women and 50 men, hospitalized with UA, were recruited. RESULTS- Patients with diabetes were more likely to have a history of hypercholesterolemia (83% vs. 60%; p = 0.02), prior history of heart disease (85% vs. 65%; p = 0.03), prior angiogram (85% vs. 67%; p = 0.04), and have more impaired physical functioning (p = 0.04) compared to those patients without diabetes. Patients with diabetes reported nausea less often (20% vs. 40%, p = 0.04) and hyperventilation more often (27.5% vs. 11.7%, p = 0.04). Patients with diabetes also experienced less squeezing (25% vs. 48%; p = 0.02) and less aching (25% vs. 45%; p = 0.04) type pain. CONCLUSIONS- Although it has been suggested that autonomic dysfunction may be a key reason why patients with diabetes may report fewer cardiac symptoms than patients without diabetes, our findings support previous research indicating that patients with diabetes experience cardiac symptoms that are similar to patients without diabetes. The minor differences in symptoms found in this study may be associated with adapting to the chronic symptoms of diabetes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Symptoms of Unstable Angina in Patients With and Without Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154604-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Symptoms of Unstable Angina in Patients With and Without Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 21, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DeVon, Holli A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">holli.devon@marquette.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sue M. Penckofer, PhD, RN; Julie Johnson Zerwic, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE- It is well established that patients with diabetes experience peripheral parathesias and autonomic dysfunction which may affect the way they perceive the symptoms of unstable angina (UA). The purpose of this study was to examine differences in symptoms for patients with and without diabetes during an episode of UA. Specific aims were to determine if there were differences between the two groups in: 1) the symptoms of unstable angina; 2) the location of pain; 3) the quality of pain; and 4) the severity of chest pain and the worst symptom experienced. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- This descriptive study used structured instruments to identify the type, location, and quality of the symptoms of UA. A convenience sample of 50 women and 50 men, hospitalized with UA, were recruited. RESULTS- Patients with diabetes were more likely to have a history of hypercholesterolemia (83% vs. 60%; p = 0.02), prior history of heart disease (85% vs. 65%; p = 0.03), prior angiogram (85% vs. 67%; p = 0.04), and have more impaired physical functioning (p = 0.04) compared to those patients without diabetes. Patients with diabetes reported nausea less often (20% vs. 40%, p = 0.04) and hyperventilation more often (27.5% vs. 11.7%, p = 0.04). Patients with diabetes also experienced less squeezing (25% vs. 48%; p = 0.02) and less aching (25% vs. 45%; p = 0.04) type pain. CONCLUSIONS- Although it has been suggested that autonomic dysfunction may be a key reason why patients with diabetes may report fewer cardiac symptoms than patients without diabetes, our findings support previous research indicating that patients with diabetes experience cardiac symptoms that are similar to patients without diabetes. The minor differences in symptoms found in this study may be associated with adapting to the chronic symptoms of diabetes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:07:53Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:07:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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