Secondary Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence: A Randomized Controlled Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154633
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Secondary Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence: A Randomized Controlled Study
Abstract:
Secondary Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence: A Randomized Controlled Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:McFarlane, Judith, DrPH
P.I. Institution Name:Texas Woman's University
Title:Parry Chair in Health Promotion & Disease Prevention
This randomized, two arm, clinical trial reports the 12 and 24 month outcome data of the differential effectiveness of two levels of abuse treatment services: assessment and a wallet-size referral card (Standard care) or assessment, a wallet-size card and four 20-minute nurse case management sessions. The setting was primary care clinics. The participants were 360 abused women who assessed positive for physical or sexual abuse within the preceding 12 months. Outcome measures were number of threats of abuse, assault, danger risks for homicide, events of work harassment, safety behaviors adopted and use of community resources. Twenty-four months following treatment both groups of women reported significantly (p<.001) fewer threats of abuse (M=14.5; 95%CI 12.6,16.4), assaults (M=15.5, 95%CI 13.5,17.4), danger risks for homicide (M=2.6; 95%CI 2.1,3.0), and events of work harassment (M=2.7; 95%CI 2.3,3.1), but there were no significant differences between groups. Compared to baseline, both groups of women adopted significantly (p<.001) more safety behaviors by 24 months (M=2.0; 95%CI 1.6, 2.3); however, community resource use declined significantly (p<.001) for both groups (M=-0.2; 95%CI-0.4, -0.2). There were no significant differences between groups. Despite the recognition of intimate partner violence against women as a global health issue associated with significant morbidity and mortality, tested treatment strategies for the primary care setting are lacking. Women in this study experienced equal levels of abuse reduction and safety behavior adoption whether in the routine assessment and wallet-size card or assessment, wallet-size card and nurse case management program. Disclosure of abuse, such as what happens with abuse assessment, was associated with the same reduction in violence and increase in safety behaviors as a nurse case management intervention. Routine assessment for abuse, with the potential to interrupt and prevent reoccurrence of intimate partner violence and associated trauma, is indicated as standard care for women
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSecondary Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence: A Randomized Controlled Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154633-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Secondary Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence: A Randomized Controlled Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McFarlane, Judith, DrPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Texas Woman's University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Parry Chair in Health Promotion &amp; Disease Prevention</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmcfarlane@twu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This randomized, two arm, clinical trial reports the 12 and 24 month outcome data of the differential effectiveness of two levels of abuse treatment services: assessment and a wallet-size referral card (Standard care) or assessment, a wallet-size card and four 20-minute nurse case management sessions. The setting was primary care clinics. The participants were 360 abused women who assessed positive for physical or sexual abuse within the preceding 12 months. Outcome measures were number of threats of abuse, assault, danger risks for homicide, events of work harassment, safety behaviors adopted and use of community resources. Twenty-four months following treatment both groups of women reported significantly (p&lt;.001) fewer threats of abuse (M=14.5; 95%CI 12.6,16.4), assaults (M=15.5, 95%CI 13.5,17.4), danger risks for homicide (M=2.6; 95%CI 2.1,3.0), and events of work harassment (M=2.7; 95%CI 2.3,3.1), but there were no significant differences between groups. Compared to baseline, both groups of women adopted significantly (p&lt;.001) more safety behaviors by 24 months (M=2.0; 95%CI 1.6, 2.3); however, community resource use declined significantly (p&lt;.001) for both groups (M=-0.2; 95%CI-0.4, -0.2). There were no significant differences between groups. Despite the recognition of intimate partner violence against women as a global health issue associated with significant morbidity and mortality, tested treatment strategies for the primary care setting are lacking. Women in this study experienced equal levels of abuse reduction and safety behavior adoption whether in the routine assessment and wallet-size card or assessment, wallet-size card and nurse case management program. Disclosure of abuse, such as what happens with abuse assessment, was associated with the same reduction in violence and increase in safety behaviors as a nurse case management intervention. Routine assessment for abuse, with the potential to interrupt and prevent reoccurrence of intimate partner violence and associated trauma, is indicated as standard care for women</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:09:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:09:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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