Comparing Two Methods of Feeding Patients After Elective Intestinal Resection

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154637
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparing Two Methods of Feeding Patients After Elective Intestinal Resection
Abstract:
Comparing Two Methods of Feeding Patients After Elective Intestinal Resection
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Noel, Ellen, RN, BSN, MN
P.I. Institution Name:Virginia Mason Medical Center
Title:Nurse Clincian
Co-Authors:Julie Barnett, RN, BSN
This quantitative study compares traditional post-operative diet advancement to an early feeding protocol. Time to food tolerance is the dependent variable. The accelerated feeding protocol is framed within a patient driven model and includes active patient participation during recovery. The patient's self- report of hunger is incorporated into the criteria for safe diet progression. Study significance is based on the understanding that nutrient tolerance and return of gastrointestinal function drive the patient's comfort, recovery, and subsequent discharge. Current research suggests that early diet advancement results in positive patient outcomes and financial benefits for health care organizations. Study procedure includes random patient assignment based on criteria set for the population with a physician approved pre-printed order as the intervention. A standardized order provides safe diet advancement for the experimental group and includes, a patient self-report hunger scale to quantify hunger, advancement criteria, and symptom assessment and interventions. Multiple variables may affect hunger and food tolerance in the postoperative patient. Data on demographics, analgesics use, mental status, pain, nausea, hunger, activity and presence of social support during hospitalization is measured. Data collection is done by informed RNs assigned to the patient. Data collection occurs at point of care. This structure provides an opportunity to incorporate applied research techniques to the study process and the contextual patient- nurse relationship provides a forum for this to take place. Prior research has focused on the ability of surgical patients to tolerate early postoperative feeding with evidence that outcomes are positive. There are virtually no studies that have combined an early feeding protocol with a patient driven model that incorporates standing diet advancement orders and the patients' reports of hunger and satiety. Significant questions can be raised regarding potential benefits of a patient driven diet advancement model both from an individual and organizational perspective.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparing Two Methods of Feeding Patients After Elective Intestinal Resectionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154637-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparing Two Methods of Feeding Patients After Elective Intestinal Resection</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Noel, Ellen, RN, BSN, MN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Virginia Mason Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Clincian</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">enoel@washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Julie Barnett, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This quantitative study compares traditional post-operative diet advancement to an early feeding protocol. Time to food tolerance is the dependent variable. The accelerated feeding protocol is framed within a patient driven model and includes active patient participation during recovery. The patient's self- report of hunger is incorporated into the criteria for safe diet progression. Study significance is based on the understanding that nutrient tolerance and return of gastrointestinal function drive the patient's comfort, recovery, and subsequent discharge. Current research suggests that early diet advancement results in positive patient outcomes and financial benefits for health care organizations. Study procedure includes random patient assignment based on criteria set for the population with a physician approved pre-printed order as the intervention. A standardized order provides safe diet advancement for the experimental group and includes, a patient self-report hunger scale to quantify hunger, advancement criteria, and symptom assessment and interventions. Multiple variables may affect hunger and food tolerance in the postoperative patient. Data on demographics, analgesics use, mental status, pain, nausea, hunger, activity and presence of social support during hospitalization is measured. Data collection is done by informed RNs assigned to the patient. Data collection occurs at point of care. This structure provides an opportunity to incorporate applied research techniques to the study process and the contextual patient- nurse relationship provides a forum for this to take place. Prior research has focused on the ability of surgical patients to tolerate early postoperative feeding with evidence that outcomes are positive. There are virtually no studies that have combined an early feeding protocol with a patient driven model that incorporates standing diet advancement orders and the patients' reports of hunger and satiety. Significant questions can be raised regarding potential benefits of a patient driven diet advancement model both from an individual and organizational perspective.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:09:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:09:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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