Depression: ôThe Invisible Gray Fogö in the Lives of African Canadian Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154640
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depression: ôThe Invisible Gray Fogö in the Lives of African Canadian Women
Abstract:
Depression: ôThe Invisible Gray Fogö in the Lives of African Canadian Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Etowa, Josephine B., RN, RM, IBCLC
P.I. Institution Name:Dalhousie university
Racialized minority groups in North America tend to be less healthy and often experience greater barriers to accessing appropriate health care compared with mainstream population. However, little is known about African Canadian women's health. Effort is currently being made to advance this state of health knowledge about African Canadians. This paper will discuss findings of a study that examined midlife health of African Canadian women. The purpose of the study was to investigate the experiences of health and well being among midlife African Nova Scotia women, with particular attention to how they are affected by menopause and a dominant ideological construct of æthe strong Black woman. Triangulation of both qualitative and quantitative research methods was used on a sample size of 50 women between the age of 40 and 65 years. Data collection methods include individual interviews, questionnaires, focus groups and community workshops. Atlas ti computer software was used to facilitate thematic data analysis. The paper will discuss midlife depression, which is a major finding of the study. Although depression is not a topic widely discussed among Black women, most of the women in this study had some experience of depression. They indicated that depression occurs under ôzillionsö of circumstances. They characterized the periods of midlife depression as short-term and sporadic feeling of ôsomething's wrongö. It is often an extension of a complicated set of ôcircumstancesö identified by some as part of a ôchain reactionö. This paper will discuss the various aspects of depression described by these women including the stigma of depression as a mental illness. It will conclude with the impact of the ômyth of the strong Black womanö on how Black women define and deal with depression. Implications of the study for nursing will also be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepression: ôThe Invisible Gray Fogö in the Lives of African Canadian Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154640-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depression: ôThe Invisible Gray Fogö in the Lives of African Canadian Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Etowa, Josephine B., RN, RM, IBCLC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Dalhousie university</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">josephine.etowa@dal.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Racialized minority groups in North America tend to be less healthy and often experience greater barriers to accessing appropriate health care compared with mainstream population. However, little is known about African Canadian women's health. Effort is currently being made to advance this state of health knowledge about African Canadians. This paper will discuss findings of a study that examined midlife health of African Canadian women. The purpose of the study was to investigate the experiences of health and well being among midlife African Nova Scotia women, with particular attention to how they are affected by menopause and a dominant ideological construct of æthe strong Black woman. Triangulation of both qualitative and quantitative research methods was used on a sample size of 50 women between the age of 40 and 65 years. Data collection methods include individual interviews, questionnaires, focus groups and community workshops. Atlas ti computer software was used to facilitate thematic data analysis. The paper will discuss midlife depression, which is a major finding of the study. Although depression is not a topic widely discussed among Black women, most of the women in this study had some experience of depression. They indicated that depression occurs under ôzillionsö of circumstances. They characterized the periods of midlife depression as short-term and sporadic feeling of ôsomething's wrongö. It is often an extension of a complicated set of ôcircumstancesö identified by some as part of a ôchain reactionö. This paper will discuss the various aspects of depression described by these women including the stigma of depression as a mental illness. It will conclude with the impact of the ômyth of the strong Black womanö on how Black women define and deal with depression. Implications of the study for nursing will also be presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:09:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:09:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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