Barriers for Parental Involvement in School-Based Childhood Obesity Prevention Programs: Is Human Subject Protection a Major Factor?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154644
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Barriers for Parental Involvement in School-Based Childhood Obesity Prevention Programs: Is Human Subject Protection a Major Factor?
Abstract:
Barriers for Parental Involvement in School-Based Childhood Obesity Prevention Programs: Is Human Subject Protection a Major Factor?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Samson, Linda F., PhD, RN, BC, CNAA
P.I. Institution Name:Governors State University
Title:Dean, College of Health Professions
Co-Authors:Constance Edwards, PhD, RN
Childhood obesity is increasing dramatically in the United States. Concern has been expressed about effectiveness of strategies to reduce obesity. Work conducted as a part of an NIH Project EXPORT Centers of Excellence in Health Disparities Research program, identified parental involvement as a key variable in securing behavioral change in children. This aspect of the overall research was conducted to help identify and explain barriers encountered in getting parental participation in school-based childhood obesity prevention programs. A combination of methods was used to elicit perceived parental barriers. These methods included focus groups, anecdotal information from on-site researchers, interviews with parental liaisons and school administrators, and discussions with teachers and parents. Results of the research indicated that the process for securing human subject protection was a major barrier for parental involvement. Required HIPAA language, despite alternative language choices was negatively perceived by many of the potential parent participants. Concerns included confidentiality and potential emotional harm. Other barriers to parental involvement included values about health promotion and family perceptions of what constituted obesity. Between group comparison demonstrated greater success in achieving parental participation when children and teachers worked together to accomplish the goal versus relying on the children only to engage their parents. Getting children engaged, actively involving children in planning and program delivery, offering incentives to participants appropriate to the research, simplifying human subject and privacy protection implementation, and reducing parents' time commitment are likely to increase the level of the parental involvement.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBarriers for Parental Involvement in School-Based Childhood Obesity Prevention Programs: Is Human Subject Protection a Major Factor?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154644-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Barriers for Parental Involvement in School-Based Childhood Obesity Prevention Programs: Is Human Subject Protection a Major Factor?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Samson, Linda F., PhD, RN, BC, CNAA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Governors State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean, College of Health Professions</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">l-samson@govst.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Constance Edwards, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Childhood obesity is increasing dramatically in the United States. Concern has been expressed about effectiveness of strategies to reduce obesity. Work conducted as a part of an NIH Project EXPORT Centers of Excellence in Health Disparities Research program, identified parental involvement as a key variable in securing behavioral change in children. This aspect of the overall research was conducted to help identify and explain barriers encountered in getting parental participation in school-based childhood obesity prevention programs. A combination of methods was used to elicit perceived parental barriers. These methods included focus groups, anecdotal information from on-site researchers, interviews with parental liaisons and school administrators, and discussions with teachers and parents. Results of the research indicated that the process for securing human subject protection was a major barrier for parental involvement. Required HIPAA language, despite alternative language choices was negatively perceived by many of the potential parent participants. Concerns included confidentiality and potential emotional harm. Other barriers to parental involvement included values about health promotion and family perceptions of what constituted obesity. Between group comparison demonstrated greater success in achieving parental participation when children and teachers worked together to accomplish the goal versus relying on the children only to engage their parents. Getting children engaged, actively involving children in planning and program delivery, offering incentives to participants appropriate to the research, simplifying human subject and privacy protection implementation, and reducing parents' time commitment are likely to increase the level of the parental involvement.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:09:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:09:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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