End-of-Life (EOL) Education for Continuing Education (CE) Providers and Staff Development (SD) Educators

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154649
Type:
Presentation
Title:
End-of-Life (EOL) Education for Continuing Education (CE) Providers and Staff Development (SD) Educators
Abstract:
End-of-Life (EOL) Education for Continuing Education (CE) Providers and Staff Development (SD) Educators
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Malloy, Pam, RN, MN, OCN
P.I. Institution Name:American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Inc
Title:Director, Special Projects
Co-Authors:Patrick Coyne, RN, MSN, CS, CRNH, FAAN; Anne Rhome, MPH, RN; Rose Virani, RN, MHA, OCN; Judith Paice, PhD, RN, FAAN; Marcia Grant, RN, DNSc, FAAN; Betty R. Ferrell, PhD, FAAN
Nursing research has demonstrated that formal education has not prepared practicing nurses to provide optimum EOL care; yet, care of patients at the EOL is contingent on adequate preparation of nurses. In evaluating ways to provide education to practicing nurses, the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) project team identified the importance of training CE providers and SD educators. The ELNEC project, supported by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (2000-2003), provided funding for three courses targeted specifically for CE providers and SD educators. The ELNEC project is a synthesis of research and knowledge in EOL care and is intended to assist clinical nurses with implementing scientifically based care in practice. Based on the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Peaceful Death document, the ELNEC curriculum focuses on nine EOL core areas with detailed teaching materials to integrate content into nursing curricula and clinical practice. This presentation will provide evaluation data from 227 educators in clinical settings (i.e., hospitals, home and long-term care, cancer centers, etc.). Results are derived from the course evaluations, pre-assessment surveys with comparison at 12 month follow-up post course, and participant goals conducted pre-course, immediate post-course and at 6 and 12 month intervals post course. At 12 months post-course, participants reported significant improvement in the effectiveness of staff in care of the dying (x= 5.65 pre-course to x = 7.26 post-course; on a scale of 0=not effective to 10=very effective). In addition, there was improvement in the effectiveness of teaching and curriculum in EOL care. Barriers cited to EOL content implementation included: time, priority, budget constraints, physician and administrative support, staff fears, anxieties and lack of clinical experience. This national effort is a major step toward preparing clinical nurses and strengthening nursing knowledge in EOL care to improve care of the dying.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnd-of-Life (EOL) Education for Continuing Education (CE) Providers and Staff Development (SD) Educatorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154649-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">End-of-Life (EOL) Education for Continuing Education (CE) Providers and Staff Development (SD) Educators</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Malloy, Pam, RN, MN, OCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Inc</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director, Special Projects</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pmalloy@aacn.nche.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patrick Coyne, RN, MSN, CS, CRNH, FAAN; Anne Rhome, MPH, RN; Rose Virani, RN, MHA, OCN; Judith Paice, PhD, RN, FAAN; Marcia Grant, RN, DNSc, FAAN; Betty R. Ferrell, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing research has demonstrated that formal education has not prepared practicing nurses to provide optimum EOL care; yet, care of patients at the EOL is contingent on adequate preparation of nurses. In evaluating ways to provide education to practicing nurses, the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) project team identified the importance of training CE providers and SD educators. The ELNEC project, supported by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (2000-2003), provided funding for three courses targeted specifically for CE providers and SD educators. The ELNEC project is a synthesis of research and knowledge in EOL care and is intended to assist clinical nurses with implementing scientifically based care in practice. Based on the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Peaceful Death document, the ELNEC curriculum focuses on nine EOL core areas with detailed teaching materials to integrate content into nursing curricula and clinical practice. This presentation will provide evaluation data from 227 educators in clinical settings (i.e., hospitals, home and long-term care, cancer centers, etc.). Results are derived from the course evaluations, pre-assessment surveys with comparison at 12 month follow-up post course, and participant goals conducted pre-course, immediate post-course and at 6 and 12 month intervals post course. At 12 months post-course, participants reported significant improvement in the effectiveness of staff in care of the dying (x= 5.65 pre-course to x = 7.26 post-course; on a scale of 0=not effective to 10=very effective). In addition, there was improvement in the effectiveness of teaching and curriculum in EOL care. Barriers cited to EOL content implementation included: time, priority, budget constraints, physician and administrative support, staff fears, anxieties and lack of clinical experience. This national effort is a major step toward preparing clinical nurses and strengthening nursing knowledge in EOL care to improve care of the dying.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:10:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:10:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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