2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154651
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Postpartum Doula Care: Content and Process
Abstract:
Postpartum Doula Care: Content and Process
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Fry McComish, Judith, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Kimberly Campbell-Voytal, PhD, RN; Carolynn Rowland, MSN, RN
Historically, in nearly every culture, women have been supported by a ôdoula,ö an experienced lay woman who provides support during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period. Several studies and two meta-analyses have found continuous support during labor and delivery to be effective. Although no studies have examined doula support during the postpartum period, postpartum doula care is being provided throughout the United States and Canada. This presentation will describe preliminary results of an ethnographic study designed to document the content, process, and meaning of postpartum doula care from the perspective of women receiving care and doulas providing care. Data were obtained through observation of four doulas as they administered care during six postpartum home visits to 15 mother-infant dyads over a three-month period, and through in-depth interviews with the mothers and doulas following care. The observation and interview data are being coded for themes and patterns reflecting the content, meaning and importance of doula care. The entire set of home visit transcripts has been coded independently by two-member teams, with final coding decisions made through consensus. Inter-rater reliability has been high. Trustworthiness is being established through triangulation and member checks. Twelve categories of care have emerged: emotional support (mother or partner), physical comfort (mother), self-care (mother), information (modules, literature or videos), referral (for specific service w/ follow-up), partner/father support, support mother/father with sibling care (physical and developmental care/parenting), communication process, and household organization. Thematic analysis is in progress. This presentation will focus primarily on maternal perceptions of competence as a parent, ability to interpret and respond to their infants' cues, and perceptions of the value of postpartum doula care. Documenting the content and process of doula care from the perspective of both mothers and doulas will provide knowledge for standardizing and improving postpartum doula care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePostpartum Doula Care: Content and Processen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154651-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Postpartum Doula Care: Content and Process</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fry McComish, Judith, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmccomis@med.wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kimberly Campbell-Voytal, PhD, RN; Carolynn Rowland, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Historically, in nearly every culture, women have been supported by a &ocirc;doula,&ouml; an experienced lay woman who provides support during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period. Several studies and two meta-analyses have found continuous support during labor and delivery to be effective. Although no studies have examined doula support during the postpartum period, postpartum doula care is being provided throughout the United States and Canada. This presentation will describe preliminary results of an ethnographic study designed to document the content, process, and meaning of postpartum doula care from the perspective of women receiving care and doulas providing care. Data were obtained through observation of four doulas as they administered care during six postpartum home visits to 15 mother-infant dyads over a three-month period, and through in-depth interviews with the mothers and doulas following care. The observation and interview data are being coded for themes and patterns reflecting the content, meaning and importance of doula care. The entire set of home visit transcripts has been coded independently by two-member teams, with final coding decisions made through consensus. Inter-rater reliability has been high. Trustworthiness is being established through triangulation and member checks. Twelve categories of care have emerged: emotional support (mother or partner), physical comfort (mother), self-care (mother), information (modules, literature or videos), referral (for specific service w/ follow-up), partner/father support, support mother/father with sibling care (physical and developmental care/parenting), communication process, and household organization. Thematic analysis is in progress. This presentation will focus primarily on maternal perceptions of competence as a parent, ability to interpret and respond to their infants' cues, and perceptions of the value of postpartum doula care. Documenting the content and process of doula care from the perspective of both mothers and doulas will provide knowledge for standardizing and improving postpartum doula care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:10:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:10:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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