2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154655
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship of Marginality, Abuse, and Health Outcomes in Women
Abstract:
The Relationship of Marginality, Abuse, and Health Outcomes in Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Koci, Anne Floyd, PhD, APRN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Georgia State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Ora Strickland, RN, PhD; David Cantor, PhD
Violence in the form of physical and/or sexual abuse presents a significant public health problem with adverse effects on women's health. A wide range of emotional and behavioral sequelae has been linked with abuse. Such sequelae increase a woman's vulnerability to future adverse health outcomes. The majority of abuse research has been done with clinical samples, yet little data exists regarding the relationship of abuse and marginality. Purpose: To examine the relationship between marginality, abuse (physical and/or sexual abuse), and health outcomes of anxiety and/or depression. Research is deficient regarding marginality, abuse and health outcomes. Methods: A secondary analysis of 568 healthy women from the community who had participated in a study of PMS. Women with chronic diseases, diagnosed physical or psychological problems, and who were on birth control pills were excluded. Childhood, adolescent and adult abuse history data were obtained. All participants completed a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. Descriptive statistics, hierarchical regression analyses, analysis of covariance and Pearson and Spearman correlations were computed. Findings: Physical, sexual and total abuse across the lifespan significantly predicted marginality, anxiety and depression. Marginality, anxiety and depression had significant positive correlations with physical and sexual abuse across the lifespan. Women without a history of physical and/or sexual abuse had significantly lower adjusted mean marginality, anxiety and depression scores than abused women. Race/ethnicity was not significantly associated with anxiety or depression. Comorbidity of anxiety and depression was noted in 9% of the sample. Sexual abuse significantly predicted comorbidity of anxiety and depression. Discussion: Abuse was shown to be a strong predictor of marginality, anxiety and depression in this study. The health impact of abuse was shown to have long-term biobehavioral consequences. (Original PMS study funded by NIH Grant No. R01-NR02705, Ora Strickland, Principal Investigator)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship of Marginality, Abuse, and Health Outcomes in Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154655-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship of Marginality, Abuse, and Health Outcomes in Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Koci, Anne Floyd, PhD, APRN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Georgia State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">akoci1@gsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ora Strickland, RN, PhD; David Cantor, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Violence in the form of physical and/or sexual abuse presents a significant public health problem with adverse effects on women's health. A wide range of emotional and behavioral sequelae has been linked with abuse. Such sequelae increase a woman's vulnerability to future adverse health outcomes. The majority of abuse research has been done with clinical samples, yet little data exists regarding the relationship of abuse and marginality. Purpose: To examine the relationship between marginality, abuse (physical and/or sexual abuse), and health outcomes of anxiety and/or depression. Research is deficient regarding marginality, abuse and health outcomes. Methods: A secondary analysis of 568 healthy women from the community who had participated in a study of PMS. Women with chronic diseases, diagnosed physical or psychological problems, and who were on birth control pills were excluded. Childhood, adolescent and adult abuse history data were obtained. All participants completed a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. Descriptive statistics, hierarchical regression analyses, analysis of covariance and Pearson and Spearman correlations were computed. Findings: Physical, sexual and total abuse across the lifespan significantly predicted marginality, anxiety and depression. Marginality, anxiety and depression had significant positive correlations with physical and sexual abuse across the lifespan. Women without a history of physical and/or sexual abuse had significantly lower adjusted mean marginality, anxiety and depression scores than abused women. Race/ethnicity was not significantly associated with anxiety or depression. Comorbidity of anxiety and depression was noted in 9% of the sample. Sexual abuse significantly predicted comorbidity of anxiety and depression. Discussion: Abuse was shown to be a strong predictor of marginality, anxiety and depression in this study. The health impact of abuse was shown to have long-term biobehavioral consequences. (Original PMS study funded by NIH Grant No. R01-NR02705, Ora Strickland, Principal Investigator)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:10:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:10:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.