Research Utilization: Tracheal Suctioning of Adults With an Artificial Airway

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154656
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Research Utilization: Tracheal Suctioning of Adults With an Artificial Airway
Abstract:
Research Utilization: Tracheal Suctioning of Adults With an Artificial Airway
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Chau, Janita Pak-Chun, RN, BN, MPhil
P.I. Institution Name:Chinese Univerisity of Hong Kong
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:David R. Thompson, PhD, MBA, RN, FRCN, FESC; Violeta Lopez, RN, PhD, FRCNA; Lai Wah Lam, RN, BN, MPhil; How Lin May Lui, MPhil; Lily Choy-Lan Chung, RN, RMN, RGN; Wai Lin Au, RN, PRDHCE, MBA
Nurses play an important role in establishing and making use of the best available evidence in enhancing clinical effectiveness and improving patient outcome. A guideline on tracheal suctioning of adults with an artificial airway was developed based on the systematic review and best practice information sheet published by The Joanna Briggs Institute. Previous studies indicated that suctioning is a potentially harmful procedure. Techniques known to reduce the adverse effects of suctioning may have substantial benefits to prevent tracheal trauma, suctioning induced hypoxemia and raised intracranial pressure. In order to address local barriers in research utilization, a multi-faceted implementation strategy has been developed, which includes the close collaboration with clinical and academic staff and the involvement of frontline clinical staff in translating the guideline for local use. The use of opinion leaders also assists in supporting staff during the implementation process. In order to persuade frontline nurses that the effort is worthwhile, it is essential to determine that the evidence based practice really works. A set of quality indicators have been identified to determine the effects of the research utilization. These include data on improved standards of care and patient outcomes. Before the dissemination, baseline data that include current practice, the effects of suctioning on haemodynamics and oxygen transport, and the incidence of pulmonary infections were collected. Using the same set of indicators, the post-implementation audit was conducted 3 months after the dissemination of evidence based guideline and differences between pre- and post-tests indicate the extent of change in patient outcomes and nurses' compliance with evidence based guideline. The implementation project outlined in the present paper highlights the importance of using a rigorous implementation process to ensure a more formal way of testing whether evidence substantiated interventions actually work.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResearch Utilization: Tracheal Suctioning of Adults With an Artificial Airwayen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154656-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Research Utilization: Tracheal Suctioning of Adults With an Artificial Airway</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chau, Janita Pak-Chun, RN, BN, MPhil</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chinese Univerisity of Hong Kong</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">janitachau@cuhk.edu.hk</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">David R. Thompson, PhD, MBA, RN, FRCN, FESC; Violeta Lopez, RN, PhD, FRCNA; Lai Wah Lam, RN, BN, MPhil; How Lin May Lui, MPhil; Lily Choy-Lan Chung, RN, RMN, RGN; Wai Lin Au, RN, PRDHCE, MBA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses play an important role in establishing and making use of the best available evidence in enhancing clinical effectiveness and improving patient outcome. A guideline on tracheal suctioning of adults with an artificial airway was developed based on the systematic review and best practice information sheet published by The Joanna Briggs Institute. Previous studies indicated that suctioning is a potentially harmful procedure. Techniques known to reduce the adverse effects of suctioning may have substantial benefits to prevent tracheal trauma, suctioning induced hypoxemia and raised intracranial pressure. In order to address local barriers in research utilization, a multi-faceted implementation strategy has been developed, which includes the close collaboration with clinical and academic staff and the involvement of frontline clinical staff in translating the guideline for local use. The use of opinion leaders also assists in supporting staff during the implementation process. In order to persuade frontline nurses that the effort is worthwhile, it is essential to determine that the evidence based practice really works. A set of quality indicators have been identified to determine the effects of the research utilization. These include data on improved standards of care and patient outcomes. Before the dissemination, baseline data that include current practice, the effects of suctioning on haemodynamics and oxygen transport, and the incidence of pulmonary infections were collected. Using the same set of indicators, the post-implementation audit was conducted 3 months after the dissemination of evidence based guideline and differences between pre- and post-tests indicate the extent of change in patient outcomes and nurses' compliance with evidence based guideline. The implementation project outlined in the present paper highlights the importance of using a rigorous implementation process to ensure a more formal way of testing whether evidence substantiated interventions actually work.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:10:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:10:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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