Revisiting and Exploring the Preceptor Role in the 21st Century: PreceptorsÆ Perceptions of Benefits, Rewards, Supports, Role, and Relationship With Newly Hired and Student Preceptees

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154661
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Revisiting and Exploring the Preceptor Role in the 21st Century: PreceptorsÆ Perceptions of Benefits, Rewards, Supports, Role, and Relationship With Newly Hired and Student Preceptees
Abstract:
Revisiting and Exploring the Preceptor Role in the 21st Century: PreceptorsÆ Perceptions of Benefits, Rewards, Supports, Role, and Relationship With Newly Hired and Student Preceptees
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:HyrkSs, Kristiina E., PhD, LicNSc, MNSc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Northern British Columbia
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Martha MacLeod, PhD, RN; Norma John, BSN, RN, MA; Martha Shoemaker, BGS
The goal of this research project, conducted in partnership with Northern Health region in British Columbia, Canada, was to explore the current state of preceptorship in this large, mostly rural region. The study describes perceptions of role, supports, benefits and commitment in relation to what makes a satisfying preceptorship, from both preceptors' and preceptees' perspective. By examining the perspectives of nursing staff, newly hired nurses and senior students, the findings increase understanding of preceptorship and how best to support it. This poster reports the preceptors' perceptions. Two instruments were used to examine preceptors' perceptions: (1) Dibert and Goldenberg's four-part questionnaire, and (2) Preceptorship Satisfaction scale. Questionnaires were sent to 189 preceptors who had participated in the Preceptor Education Program between October 2003 and September 2004. The preceptors' age varied between 22-58 years, the mean age was 45.6 years. Most respondents were female (97.6%), Registered Nurses (78%). Over half of the preceptors were diploma ûprepared nurses (58.5%); slightly less than one quarter had Bachelor's degree (24.4%). One third of the preceptors (34.1%) had graduated from the local university, and one third (36.6%) in BC, or elsewhere in Canada (26.8%). Respondents' work experience in nursing varied between 2-38 years and this represented several different specialties of nursing. In keeping with the location of a rural health region, 20% of respondents worked in multiple specialties. Commitment to the preceptor role and perceptions of support were positively associated with preceptors' perceptions of benefits and rewards. Perceptions of the preceptor-preceptee relationship, incentive, and reflective approach for learning in practice with preceptees were also positively associated with perceptions of the benefits and rewards. The findings have implications for nursing administrators and educators to ensure that adequate benefits, rewards and supports are continuously available to preceptors. Recommendations for developing preceptor education programs are proposed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRevisiting and Exploring the Preceptor Role in the 21st Century: PreceptorsÆ Perceptions of Benefits, Rewards, Supports, Role, and Relationship With Newly Hired and Student Precepteesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154661-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Revisiting and Exploring the Preceptor Role in the 21st Century: Preceptors&AElig; Perceptions of Benefits, Rewards, Supports, Role, and Relationship With Newly Hired and Student Preceptees</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">HyrkSs, Kristiina E., PhD, LicNSc, MNSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Northern British Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hyrkask@unbc.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Martha MacLeod, PhD, RN; Norma John, BSN, RN, MA; Martha Shoemaker, BGS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The goal of this research project, conducted in partnership with Northern Health region in British Columbia, Canada, was to explore the current state of preceptorship in this large, mostly rural region. The study describes perceptions of role, supports, benefits and commitment in relation to what makes a satisfying preceptorship, from both preceptors' and preceptees' perspective. By examining the perspectives of nursing staff, newly hired nurses and senior students, the findings increase understanding of preceptorship and how best to support it. This poster reports the preceptors' perceptions. Two instruments were used to examine preceptors' perceptions: (1) Dibert and Goldenberg's four-part questionnaire, and (2) Preceptorship Satisfaction scale. Questionnaires were sent to 189 preceptors who had participated in the Preceptor Education Program between October 2003 and September 2004. The preceptors' age varied between 22-58 years, the mean age was 45.6 years. Most respondents were female (97.6%), Registered Nurses (78%). Over half of the preceptors were diploma &ucirc;prepared nurses (58.5%); slightly less than one quarter had Bachelor's degree (24.4%). One third of the preceptors (34.1%) had graduated from the local university, and one third (36.6%) in BC, or elsewhere in Canada (26.8%). Respondents' work experience in nursing varied between 2-38 years and this represented several different specialties of nursing. In keeping with the location of a rural health region, 20% of respondents worked in multiple specialties. Commitment to the preceptor role and perceptions of support were positively associated with preceptors' perceptions of benefits and rewards. Perceptions of the preceptor-preceptee relationship, incentive, and reflective approach for learning in practice with preceptees were also positively associated with perceptions of the benefits and rewards. The findings have implications for nursing administrators and educators to ensure that adequate benefits, rewards and supports are continuously available to preceptors. Recommendations for developing preceptor education programs are proposed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:10:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:10:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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