Geographic and Seasonal Variations in Shower Bath Heat and Humidity: Relationship to Aggressive Behavior Among Nursing Home Residents With Dementia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154665
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Geographic and Seasonal Variations in Shower Bath Heat and Humidity: Relationship to Aggressive Behavior Among Nursing Home Residents With Dementia
Abstract:
Geographic and Seasonal Variations in Shower Bath Heat and Humidity: Relationship to Aggressive Behavior Among Nursing Home Residents With Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Whall, Ann, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:professor
Co-Authors:Kathleen B. Colling, RN, PhD; Gwi-Ryung Son, PhD, RN; HyoJeong Kim, PhD; Cornelia Beck, RN, PhD, FAAN; Need-Driven Behavior Collaborative Research Group (Ndb-crg),
The Need-driven Dementia-compromised Behavior (NDB) Model posits that temperature and humidity, as proximal variables in the immediate environment, are dynamic situational factors that may account for the occurrence of aggressive behavior (AB) in nursing home residents with dementia (NHRD). The first purpose of the study was to examine geographic and seasonal variations in temperature/humidity during the shower bath for NHRD. The second purpose was to explore the relationship between temperature/humidity and AB during the shower bath for NHRD. The Tandy Indoor Temperature/Humidity Meter was used to measure temperature and humidity every ten minutes during 399 shower baths administered to 226 residents in 26 nursing homes in Michigan and Arkansas. Results showed that the mean bathroom temperature was 24.7¦C, with a range of 15 to 32¦C. Forty-four percent of the shower baths were between 20 and 24¦C, and 1.5% were less than 20¦C. Bathroom temperatures in Michigan nursing homes were, on average, 1.4¦C warmer than those in Arkansas. Mean humidity during the baths was 50%, with a range of 7 to 83%. Overall, 43% of baths were between 30-50% humidity and 44% were higher than 50% humidity. Fourteen percent of bath humidity was below 30% indicating extreme dryness of the shower environment. Bathroom humidity in Michigan was 6.7% less than in Arkansas. Seasonal differences (Spring, Summer and Fall) were found with higher temperatures in Michigan, and higher humidity (Spring, Fall, and Winter) for Arkansas. Mean bath temperature and humidity for residents with AB was lower, but was not statistically significant. Results suggest that for NHRD, consideration to geographic and seasonal changes in temperature/humidity should be made by caregivers during bathing. Variable temperature and humidity combined with age-related thermoregulator problems may contribute to behavioral issues in bathing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGeographic and Seasonal Variations in Shower Bath Heat and Humidity: Relationship to Aggressive Behavior Among Nursing Home Residents With Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154665-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Geographic and Seasonal Variations in Shower Bath Heat and Humidity: Relationship to Aggressive Behavior Among Nursing Home Residents With Dementia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Whall, Ann, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">annwhall@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen B. Colling, RN, PhD; Gwi-Ryung Son, PhD, RN; HyoJeong Kim, PhD; Cornelia Beck, RN, PhD, FAAN; Need-Driven Behavior Collaborative Research Group (Ndb-crg),</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Need-driven Dementia-compromised Behavior (NDB) Model posits that temperature and humidity, as proximal variables in the immediate environment, are dynamic situational factors that may account for the occurrence of aggressive behavior (AB) in nursing home residents with dementia (NHRD). The first purpose of the study was to examine geographic and seasonal variations in temperature/humidity during the shower bath for NHRD. The second purpose was to explore the relationship between temperature/humidity and AB during the shower bath for NHRD. The Tandy Indoor Temperature/Humidity Meter was used to measure temperature and humidity every ten minutes during 399 shower baths administered to 226 residents in 26 nursing homes in Michigan and Arkansas. Results showed that the mean bathroom temperature was 24.7&brvbar;C, with a range of 15 to 32&brvbar;C. Forty-four percent of the shower baths were between 20 and 24&brvbar;C, and 1.5% were less than 20&brvbar;C. Bathroom temperatures in Michigan nursing homes were, on average, 1.4&brvbar;C warmer than those in Arkansas. Mean humidity during the baths was 50%, with a range of 7 to 83%. Overall, 43% of baths were between 30-50% humidity and 44% were higher than 50% humidity. Fourteen percent of bath humidity was below 30% indicating extreme dryness of the shower environment. Bathroom humidity in Michigan was 6.7% less than in Arkansas. Seasonal differences (Spring, Summer and Fall) were found with higher temperatures in Michigan, and higher humidity (Spring, Fall, and Winter) for Arkansas. Mean bath temperature and humidity for residents with AB was lower, but was not statistically significant. Results suggest that for NHRD, consideration to geographic and seasonal changes in temperature/humidity should be made by caregivers during bathing. Variable temperature and humidity combined with age-related thermoregulator problems may contribute to behavioral issues in bathing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:10:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:10:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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