A History of Healing Traditions in American Nursing: African-American WomenÆs Role as Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154668
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A History of Healing Traditions in American Nursing: African-American WomenÆs Role as Nurses
Abstract:
A History of Healing Traditions in American Nursing: African-American WomenÆs Role as Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Smith, Glenda L., DSN, RNC, NNP, APRN, BC, PNP
P.I. Institution Name:Tuskegee University
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
The healing role of African-American women in their communities can be traced back to African culture. Prior to slavery in the US, African women held the roles of spiritual healer or midwife and provided guidance to the community on matters of health and illness. These women carried this knowledge with them to the US as slaves and passed this information orally to the next generation of women healers. An ethnographic study to understand traditional health practices in rural African-American culture yielded a historical tradition of using herbal remedies by these women. Data suggest a strong connection between spirituality, West African culture, and these health beliefs and practices. The use of slave narratives and interviews will further illustrate the worth of these women as 'nurse' healers in the community.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA History of Healing Traditions in American Nursing: African-American WomenÆs Role as Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154668-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A History of Healing Traditions in American Nursing: African-American Women&AElig;s Role as Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Glenda L., DSN, RNC, NNP, APRN, BC, PNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Tuskegee University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">abbycatt@mindspring.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The healing role of African-American women in their communities can be traced back to African culture. Prior to slavery in the US, African women held the roles of spiritual healer or midwife and provided guidance to the community on matters of health and illness. These women carried this knowledge with them to the US as slaves and passed this information orally to the next generation of women healers. An ethnographic study to understand traditional health practices in rural African-American culture yielded a historical tradition of using herbal remedies by these women. Data suggest a strong connection between spirituality, West African culture, and these health beliefs and practices. The use of slave narratives and interviews will further illustrate the worth of these women as 'nurse' healers in the community.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:10:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:10:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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