2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154682
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Changing Birth Preferences: A Difficult Decision for the Laboring Woman
Abstract:
Changing Birth Preferences: A Difficult Decision for the Laboring Woman
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Carlton, Troy, MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Instructor
Co-Authors:Lynn Clark Callister, PhD, RN, FAAN
Background: Birth can leave a lasting impact depending on women's perceptions of their experience. Decades after giving birth, women's memories are still vivid and deeply felt. Women reported positive birth experiences when they felt in control, respected, use of effective communication, and shared decision making was established. In our clinical observations, we have witnessed women who have expressed their birth preference, yet have changed that preference once they were in active labor. In addition, when a woman considers changing her birth preference due to a variety of factors, feelings of guilt and inadequacy may results. Questions have emerged as to what factors influence this change in birth preference, the decision-making process of laboring women during this experience, and how clinicians can provide better support to the laboring woman. Methodology: A purposive sample of twenty (20) women who had recently given birth in one of three birthing units in the mountain west region of the United States participated in the study. Women who indicated upon admission to the birthing unit their birth preference who later changed their preference were included in the study. Audio taped interviews were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis in conjunction with a continuing review of the literature. Findings: This study demonstrated many complex factors and issues related to changing birth preferences such as intense pain, length of labor, exhaustion, not knowing what to expect, etc.. The pivotal role of the nurse and other clinicians was also articulated. In addition, a framework has begun to emerge outlining the process of decision making in childbearing women. Conclusions: Nurses must provide a high level of supportive surveillance, respecting women's decisions if the birth is to be perceived as positive. Building confidence in the woman's ability to accomplish her goals for giving birth is an essential nursing intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChanging Birth Preferences: A Difficult Decision for the Laboring Womanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154682-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Changing Birth Preferences: A Difficult Decision for the Laboring Woman</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Carlton, Troy, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">troy_carlton@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lynn Clark Callister, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Birth can leave a lasting impact depending on women's perceptions of their experience. Decades after giving birth, women's memories are still vivid and deeply felt. Women reported positive birth experiences when they felt in control, respected, use of effective communication, and shared decision making was established. In our clinical observations, we have witnessed women who have expressed their birth preference, yet have changed that preference once they were in active labor. In addition, when a woman considers changing her birth preference due to a variety of factors, feelings of guilt and inadequacy may results. Questions have emerged as to what factors influence this change in birth preference, the decision-making process of laboring women during this experience, and how clinicians can provide better support to the laboring woman. Methodology: A purposive sample of twenty (20) women who had recently given birth in one of three birthing units in the mountain west region of the United States participated in the study. Women who indicated upon admission to the birthing unit their birth preference who later changed their preference were included in the study. Audio taped interviews were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis in conjunction with a continuing review of the literature. Findings: This study demonstrated many complex factors and issues related to changing birth preferences such as intense pain, length of labor, exhaustion, not knowing what to expect, etc.. The pivotal role of the nurse and other clinicians was also articulated. In addition, a framework has begun to emerge outlining the process of decision making in childbearing women. Conclusions: Nurses must provide a high level of supportive surveillance, respecting women's decisions if the birth is to be perceived as positive. Building confidence in the woman's ability to accomplish her goals for giving birth is an essential nursing intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:11:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:11:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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