2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154691
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How confident do youngsters feel about performing health care tasks?
Abstract:
How confident do youngsters feel about performing health care tasks?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1997
Conference Date:June 20 - 21, 1997
Author:Froman, Robin, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Medical Branch
Title:Associate Dean for Research, Professor
Objective:How Confident Do Youngsters Feel About Performing Health Tasks?

Robin D. Froman

University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA



Purpose and Objectives: Health providers' interest in self-efficacy (SE), or one's confidence for performing specific tasks, has grown steadily. Efficacy perceptions are consistently predictive of behaviors attempted, persevered at and successfully completed (Bandura, 1986), thus making them important study variables for health professionals interested in altering disease incidence through lifestyle choices. Much research has been directed at learning more about adults' SE perceptions, especially for habitual behaviors related to chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiac disease and AIDS (Stretcher et al, 1986). Little attention has been given to youngsters' SE perceptions as they approach behaviors that will be practiced repeatedly and carried into adulthood. The objective of this research was to develop a measure of middle school students' SE perceptions for health behaviors, and to determine what personal characteristics the perceptions relate to. The research question asked was "What are the SE perceptions of 6th to 8th grade students for specific health tasks and how do they relate to socioeconomic (SES), ethnic group, gender, age and knowledge?"

Significance of the Research Problem: Two significant challenges faced by nursing are providing anticipatory guidance and establishing health promotion behaviors in the general public. Without specific information about deficits and entry characteristics, it is difficult to individualize interventions related to these challenges. This research identifies efficacy perceptions youths' have for tasks likely to become lifestyle behaviors and provides a psychometrically sound measure for them. This information should facilitate both research and anticipatory guidance. Knowledge about personal characteristics related to the perceptions will additionally allow individualization of health promotion interventions.

Methodology:As part of a federal grant (NIH R25 RRO721), student knowledge and SE for personal behaviors for four health topics (1-cancer, 2-AIDS, 3-safe product use, and 4-sun and skin) were surveyed in middle school classrooms. The topics are those covered in four of the many issues of BioRAP, a health science newsletter for adolescents. BioRAP is produced and distributed by Connecticut United for Research Excellence (CURE) Inc., a non-profit organization. Data from over 19,000 students were collected. Asian-, African-, Latino- and Caucasian-American groups were represented and an approximately equal number of males and females from a range of SES backgrounds. Short, content tests, with well-established psychometric properties were used to measure knowledge. Four, 4-item, topic specific self-report SE scales were developed. Data on students' ethnicity, SES, gender, and grade were collected. Regression and analysis of variance were used to study relationships between biographic and SE variables.

Results: Across all four topics, averages of between 61 and 73% correct on the four health content tests were found. The brief SE scales showed single factor structure on principal factor analysis, explained between 79 and 87% of item covariances, and had internal consistency estimates in the .70s. Average SE scores ranged from a low of 3.28 (SD=.74) for safe product use to a high of 4.14 (SD=. 62) for AIDS related behaviors on the 5-point SE scales (5 =high efficacy). Efficacy perceptions and knowledge scores showed correlations ranging from .15 to .18 dependent on topic. Adjusted R squares from regressions showed slightly more than 20% of the variance in SE predictable for each of the four topics. Minimal differences were found related to gender. Age, SES and ethnic group were related to efficacy perceptions. In particular, African Americans showed higher and Asians showed lower efficacy perceptions.

Implications for Nursing and Research: Helping youngsters develop appropriate efficacy perceptions will contribute to better health in adulthood. The low correlations between knowledge and efficacy imply that merely providing information to youngsters may be insufficient to create needed levels of confidence for performing specific health tasks. SES and ethnic group differences on efficacy suggest further study of theoretical model differences between ethnic groups may be warranted.









Design:



Population, Sample, Setting, Years:



Concept or Variables Studied Together:



Methods:



Findings:



Conclusions:



Implications:

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
20-Jun-1997
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow confident do youngsters feel about performing health care tasks?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154691-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How confident do youngsters feel about performing health care tasks?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1997</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June 20 - 21, 1997</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Froman, Robin, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Medical Branch</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Research, Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rdfroman@utmb.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective:How Confident Do Youngsters Feel About Performing Health Tasks?<br/><br/>Robin D. Froman <br/><br/>University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA<br/><br/><br/><br/>Purpose and Objectives: Health providers' interest in self-efficacy (SE), or one's confidence for performing specific tasks, has grown steadily. Efficacy perceptions are consistently predictive of behaviors attempted, persevered at and successfully completed (Bandura, 1986), thus making them important study variables for health professionals interested in altering disease incidence through lifestyle choices. Much research has been directed at learning more about adults' SE perceptions, especially for habitual behaviors related to chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiac disease and AIDS (Stretcher et al, 1986). Little attention has been given to youngsters' SE perceptions as they approach behaviors that will be practiced repeatedly and carried into adulthood. The objective of this research was to develop a measure of middle school students' SE perceptions for health behaviors, and to determine what personal characteristics the perceptions relate to. The research question asked was &quot;What are the SE perceptions of 6th to 8th grade students for specific health tasks and how do they relate to socioeconomic (SES), ethnic group, gender, age and knowledge?&quot; <br/><br/>Significance of the Research Problem: Two significant challenges faced by nursing are providing anticipatory guidance and establishing health promotion behaviors in the general public. Without specific information about deficits and entry characteristics, it is difficult to individualize interventions related to these challenges. This research identifies efficacy perceptions youths' have for tasks likely to become lifestyle behaviors and provides a psychometrically sound measure for them. This information should facilitate both research and anticipatory guidance. Knowledge about personal characteristics related to the perceptions will additionally allow individualization of health promotion interventions.<br/><br/>Methodology:As part of a federal grant (NIH R25 RRO721), student knowledge and SE for personal behaviors for four health topics (1-cancer, 2-AIDS, 3-safe product use, and 4-sun and skin) were surveyed in middle school classrooms. The topics are those covered in four of the many issues of BioRAP, a health science newsletter for adolescents. BioRAP is produced and distributed by Connecticut United for Research Excellence (CURE) Inc., a non-profit organization. Data from over 19,000 students were collected. Asian-, African-, Latino- and Caucasian-American groups were represented and an approximately equal number of males and females from a range of SES backgrounds. Short, content tests, with well-established psychometric properties were used to measure knowledge. Four, 4-item, topic specific self-report SE scales were developed. Data on students' ethnicity, SES, gender, and grade were collected. Regression and analysis of variance were used to study relationships between biographic and SE variables. <br/><br/>Results: Across all four topics, averages of between 61 and 73% correct on the four health content tests were found. The brief SE scales showed single factor structure on principal factor analysis, explained between 79 and 87% of item covariances, and had internal consistency estimates in the .70s. Average SE scores ranged from a low of 3.28 (SD=.74) for safe product use to a high of 4.14 (SD=. 62) for AIDS related behaviors on the 5-point SE scales (5 =high efficacy). Efficacy perceptions and knowledge scores showed correlations ranging from .15 to .18 dependent on topic. Adjusted R squares from regressions showed slightly more than 20% of the variance in SE predictable for each of the four topics. Minimal differences were found related to gender. Age, SES and ethnic group were related to efficacy perceptions. In particular, African Americans showed higher and Asians showed lower efficacy perceptions.<br/><br/>Implications for Nursing and Research: Helping youngsters develop appropriate efficacy perceptions will contribute to better health in adulthood. The low correlations between knowledge and efficacy imply that merely providing information to youngsters may be insufficient to create needed levels of confidence for performing specific health tasks. SES and ethnic group differences on efficacy suggest further study of theoretical model differences between ethnic groups may be warranted.<br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/>Design:<br/><br/><br/><br/>Population, Sample, Setting, Years:<br/><br/><br/><br/>Concept or Variables Studied Together:<br/><br/><br/><br/>Methods:<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings:<br/><br/><br/><br/>Conclusions:<br/><br/><br/><br/>Implications:<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:12:02Z-
dc.date.issued1997-06-20en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:12:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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