Life in a pill bottle:The lived experience of persons on HIV combination drug therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154692
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Life in a pill bottle:The lived experience of persons on HIV combination drug therapy
Abstract:
Life in a pill bottle:The lived experience of persons on HIV combination drug therapy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1999
Conference Date:June 26, 1999
Author:Jones, Sande, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Florida International University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: Powerful new "drug cocktails" are changing the face of AIDS from dying with a terminal syndrome to living with a chronic disease. However, the medication schedule involves taking multiple pills, in concert with varying food and fluid requirements. There are numerous side effects of the medications. Scientific sessions presented at the International AIDS conference, Geneva, Switzerland, June, 1998, have reported medication treatment failures, and the emergence of drug-resistant HIV, related to patients' non-compliance with the prescribed medication regimen. Although research studies have examined compliance with HIV/AIDS medications, there are no documented studies that have explored, from the client's perspective, the meaning of medications and the concept of compliance. Race(1997) argues against the concept of compliance for HIV medications and states that a more useful and accurate perspective would examine the meaning of medications as manifested in people's everyday lives. The purpose of this study is to describe, from the individual's view, what day-to-day life is like for the person on HIV combination drug therapy.



Design:Qualitative research; phenomenology



Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Five HIV persons (3 women and two men) who had been prescribed HIV combination drug therapy for at least six months. The three women were substance abusers (alcohol or cocaine).



Concept or Variables Studied Together: Lived experience of daily life

on HIV combination drug therapy



Methods:In-depth phenomenological interviews were conducted and audio-taped. The tapes were transcribed. A follow-up interview was held with each participant in order to review their transcript and allow for further reflections on the experience.



Findings:The participants revealed a wide variety of ways in which individuals attempt to cope with a complicated drug regimen. From the need for committment and perfection, to the realization that a disorganized life is not conducive to an organized medication schedule, the participants frankly discussed their daily lives in relation to adherence and non-adherence. The women struggled to take their medications each day, and needed constant reminders. But at times they were unsuccessful. One women related that her medications were delivered to her home by parcel post each month. For over three months, she placed boxes of drugs into her refrigerator, and never took one pill. When the doctor would ask her how she was doing with her medications, she would lie and say that she was taking them on schedule. Another women described attempts to adhere to her medication schedule by posting notes on her refrigerator door. She did well, except when she went on drinking binges. "When I start drinking, I don't care about anything. I would rather drink than take my pills." The third women was doing better, because her three children reminded her each day to take her medications. "If it wasn't for those kids, I don't know how it would be." The women described medication adherence as "perseverance" and "taking it one day at a time". In contrast, the male participants, who were health care professionals, described adherence in relation to commitment and the need for perfection. Both men had developed a variety of routines and rituals that helped facilitate successful medication taking. But at times, they too were non-adherent, because of vacations away from home and work or from just being too tired to stay up and take the last dose. When this occurred, they were ridden with guilt for being less than perfect.



Conclusions: The participants' stories divulged a delicate balance between quality of life and medications for life, a tightrope dance that many persons with HIV encounter on a daily basis.



Implications:Compliance is a word that is frequently used to label patients. However, nursing research needs to explore the concept of adherence as it realtes to the person's lifestyle and situated context.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Jun-1999
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLife in a pill bottle:The lived experience of persons on HIV combination drug therapyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154692-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Life in a pill bottle:The lived experience of persons on HIV combination drug therapy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June 26, 1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Sande, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Florida International University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joness@fiu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Powerful new &quot;drug cocktails&quot; are changing the face of AIDS from dying with a terminal syndrome to living with a chronic disease. However, the medication schedule involves taking multiple pills, in concert with varying food and fluid requirements. There are numerous side effects of the medications. Scientific sessions presented at the International AIDS conference, Geneva, Switzerland, June, 1998, have reported medication treatment failures, and the emergence of drug-resistant HIV, related to patients' non-compliance with the prescribed medication regimen. Although research studies have examined compliance with HIV/AIDS medications, there are no documented studies that have explored, from the client's perspective, the meaning of medications and the concept of compliance. Race(1997) argues against the concept of compliance for HIV medications and states that a more useful and accurate perspective would examine the meaning of medications as manifested in people's everyday lives. The purpose of this study is to describe, from the individual's view, what day-to-day life is like for the person on HIV combination drug therapy. <br/><br/><br/><br/>Design:Qualitative research; phenomenology<br/><br/><br/><br/>Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Five HIV persons (3 women and two men) who had been prescribed HIV combination drug therapy for at least six months. The three women were substance abusers (alcohol or cocaine).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Concept or Variables Studied Together: Lived experience of daily life<br/><br/>on HIV combination drug therapy<br/><br/><br/><br/>Methods:In-depth phenomenological interviews were conducted and audio-taped. The tapes were transcribed. A follow-up interview was held with each participant in order to review their transcript and allow for further reflections on the experience.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings:The participants revealed a wide variety of ways in which individuals attempt to cope with a complicated drug regimen. From the need for committment and perfection, to the realization that a disorganized life is not conducive to an organized medication schedule, the participants frankly discussed their daily lives in relation to adherence and non-adherence. The women struggled to take their medications each day, and needed constant reminders. But at times they were unsuccessful. One women related that her medications were delivered to her home by parcel post each month. For over three months, she placed boxes of drugs into her refrigerator, and never took one pill. When the doctor would ask her how she was doing with her medications, she would lie and say that she was taking them on schedule. Another women described attempts to adhere to her medication schedule by posting notes on her refrigerator door. She did well, except when she went on drinking binges. &quot;When I start drinking, I don't care about anything. I would rather drink than take my pills.&quot; The third women was doing better, because her three children reminded her each day to take her medications. &quot;If it wasn't for those kids, I don't know how it would be.&quot; The women described medication adherence as &quot;perseverance&quot; and &quot;taking it one day at a time&quot;. In contrast, the male participants, who were health care professionals, described adherence in relation to commitment and the need for perfection. Both men had developed a variety of routines and rituals that helped facilitate successful medication taking. But at times, they too were non-adherent, because of vacations away from home and work or from just being too tired to stay up and take the last dose. When this occurred, they were ridden with guilt for being less than perfect.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Conclusions: The participants' stories divulged a delicate balance between quality of life and medications for life, a tightrope dance that many persons with HIV encounter on a daily basis.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Implications:Compliance is a word that is frequently used to label patients. However, nursing research needs to explore the concept of adherence as it realtes to the person's lifestyle and situated context.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:12:06Z-
dc.date.issued1999-06-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:12:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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