2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154693
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Alterations in Body Temperature in Hospitalized HIV/AIDS Patients
Abstract:
Alterations in Body Temperature in Hospitalized HIV/AIDS Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International Beta Tau Chapter
Conference Year:1997
Author:Jones, Sande, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Florida International University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective:Because of the questions raised by staff nurses regarding their anecdotal observations of fever in hospitalized HIV/AIDS patients, a nursing research study was conducted to examine the incidence and occurrence of fever in hospitalized HIV/AIDS patients. Staff nurses had been asked to discuss their nursing practice for fever care as part of a study on current nursing practice for symptom management in HIV/AIDS (Jones, 1995). The staff nurses reported that a) regardless of the admitting diagnosis or admission temperature, HIV/AIDS patients had higher body temperatures than other medical-surgical patients; b) were prone to episodes of fever that occurred at random times, but were often self-limiting; c) that HIV/AIDS patients born outside of the United States had more episodes of fevers than patients born in the United States; d) that men with HIV/AIDS had more episodes of fever than women; and e) that, unlike other medical-surgical patients, AIDS patients in general did not show increases in their white blood cell count (WBC), even when an infectious process and fever was occurring. The nurses also stated that AIDS patients had the ability to predict the onset of fever before there was a corresponding rise in body temperature. Nursing research often evolves from questions posed by staff nurses working in the practice setting (Kirchoff, 1995). Because of the questions and observations of the staff nureses, a research study was conducted to further explore the incidence and degree of temperature elevation in hospitalized HIV/AIDS patients.



Design: Concurrent and retrospective review



Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The sample consisted of 100 HIV/AIDS patients, admitted to the Special Immunology/Infectious Disease Unit at a South Florida teaching hospital from June 1995-June 1996. There were 27 females and 73 males. The mean age of the total sample was 40. The mean age of the females was 40 (range of 31-54 years of age), and the mean age of the men was 40 (range of 29-62 years of age). The sample was culturally diverse. The female group included five white non-Hispanic; 13 black non-Hispanic and nine white Hispanics. Seventeen women were born in the United States, eight were born in the Carribbean Islands (Cuba, Puerto Rico and Haiti) and two were born in South America. In the male group, 32 men were white non-Hispanic, 10 were black non-Hispanic, 29 were white Hispanic and two were black Hispanic. Forty men were born in the united States, 23 were born in the Caribbean islands (Cuba, Haiti and Puerto Rico), five were born in South America and five were born in other countries (Germany, Australia).



Concept or Variables Studied Together: Occurrence of fever in hospitalized HIV/AIDS patients and demographic and physiological variables



Methods: Concurrent and retrospective chart review



Findings: The sample's mean hemoglobin was below normal at 11.01 (SD 2.3) and mean hematocrit was also low at 32.5 (SD 7.43). Mean hemoglobin for the male group was 11.2, with a mean hematocrit of 33.5. The mean for the female group was slightly lower, 10.3 and 29.9. The mean white blood cell count (WBC) for the sample was in the low normal range of 5.92 (SD 4.5). The mean WBC for the male group was 5.8, and the mean for the female group was 6.0. The mean admission weight for the sample was 140.18 (SD 28.08). The mean weight for the male group was 145.95, while the mean for the female group was lower at 126.07 pounds. The mean CD4 cell count for the sample was 115.2 (SD 165), placing the sample in the AIDS category. The mean CD4 cell count for the male group was 92.38 and the mean for the female group was higher at 171.13. An analysis of each of the first eight temperatures taken during hospitalization revealed that between 35% to 57% of patients had at least one body temperature reading over 98.6 F. during the first 24 hours of admission to the hospital. Fifty-seven patients (57%) had admission temperatures above 98.6 F. Subsequent elevated temperatures in order of readings were 38%, 46%, 53%, 47%, 42%, 41% and 35%. Analysis of the patients' temperature records over a three-day period revealed that 60% of the patients had at least one fever episode (temperature of 100 F. or higher) during hospitalization. A low-grade fever of 100 F. to 100.9 F. was experienced by 20% of the patients. A moderate fever of 101 F. to 101.9 F. was experienced by another 20% of the patients. A high fever of 102 F. or more was experienced by the remaining 20% of the patients. Stepwise regression analysis was conducted on admission lab work and the first eight temepratures recorded in the hospital. Using gender as a dependent variable, a significant difference (p
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International Beta Tau Chapter

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAlterations in Body Temperature in Hospitalized HIV/AIDS Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154693-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Alterations in Body Temperature in Hospitalized HIV/AIDS Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International Beta Tau Chapter</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1997</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Sande, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Florida International University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joness@fiu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective:Because of the questions raised by staff nurses regarding their anecdotal observations of fever in hospitalized HIV/AIDS patients, a nursing research study was conducted to examine the incidence and occurrence of fever in hospitalized HIV/AIDS patients. Staff nurses had been asked to discuss their nursing practice for fever care as part of a study on current nursing practice for symptom management in HIV/AIDS (Jones, 1995). The staff nurses reported that a) regardless of the admitting diagnosis or admission temperature, HIV/AIDS patients had higher body temperatures than other medical-surgical patients; b) were prone to episodes of fever that occurred at random times, but were often self-limiting; c) that HIV/AIDS patients born outside of the United States had more episodes of fevers than patients born in the United States; d) that men with HIV/AIDS had more episodes of fever than women; and e) that, unlike other medical-surgical patients, AIDS patients in general did not show increases in their white blood cell count (WBC), even when an infectious process and fever was occurring. The nurses also stated that AIDS patients had the ability to predict the onset of fever before there was a corresponding rise in body temperature. Nursing research often evolves from questions posed by staff nurses working in the practice setting (Kirchoff, 1995). Because of the questions and observations of the staff nureses, a research study was conducted to further explore the incidence and degree of temperature elevation in hospitalized HIV/AIDS patients. <br/><br/><br/><br/>Design: Concurrent and retrospective review<br/><br/><br/><br/>Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The sample consisted of 100 HIV/AIDS patients, admitted to the Special Immunology/Infectious Disease Unit at a South Florida teaching hospital from June 1995-June 1996. There were 27 females and 73 males. The mean age of the total sample was 40. The mean age of the females was 40 (range of 31-54 years of age), and the mean age of the men was 40 (range of 29-62 years of age). The sample was culturally diverse. The female group included five white non-Hispanic; 13 black non-Hispanic and nine white Hispanics. Seventeen women were born in the United States, eight were born in the Carribbean Islands (Cuba, Puerto Rico and Haiti) and two were born in South America. In the male group, 32 men were white non-Hispanic, 10 were black non-Hispanic, 29 were white Hispanic and two were black Hispanic. Forty men were born in the united States, 23 were born in the Caribbean islands (Cuba, Haiti and Puerto Rico), five were born in South America and five were born in other countries (Germany, Australia). <br/><br/><br/><br/>Concept or Variables Studied Together: Occurrence of fever in hospitalized HIV/AIDS patients and demographic and physiological variables<br/><br/><br/><br/>Methods: Concurrent and retrospective chart review<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings: The sample's mean hemoglobin was below normal at 11.01 (SD 2.3) and mean hematocrit was also low at 32.5 (SD 7.43). Mean hemoglobin for the male group was 11.2, with a mean hematocrit of 33.5. The mean for the female group was slightly lower, 10.3 and 29.9. The mean white blood cell count (WBC) for the sample was in the low normal range of 5.92 (SD 4.5). The mean WBC for the male group was 5.8, and the mean for the female group was 6.0. The mean admission weight for the sample was 140.18 (SD 28.08). The mean weight for the male group was 145.95, while the mean for the female group was lower at 126.07 pounds. The mean CD4 cell count for the sample was 115.2 (SD 165), placing the sample in the AIDS category. The mean CD4 cell count for the male group was 92.38 and the mean for the female group was higher at 171.13. An analysis of each of the first eight temperatures taken during hospitalization revealed that between 35% to 57% of patients had at least one body temperature reading over 98.6 F. during the first 24 hours of admission to the hospital. Fifty-seven patients (57%) had admission temperatures above 98.6 F. Subsequent elevated temperatures in order of readings were 38%, 46%, 53%, 47%, 42%, 41% and 35%. Analysis of the patients' temperature records over a three-day period revealed that 60% of the patients had at least one fever episode (temperature of 100 F. or higher) during hospitalization. A low-grade fever of 100 F. to 100.9 F. was experienced by 20% of the patients. A moderate fever of 101 F. to 101.9 F. was experienced by another 20% of the patients. A high fever of 102 F. or more was experienced by the remaining 20% of the patients. Stepwise regression analysis was conducted on admission lab work and the first eight temepratures recorded in the hospital. Using gender as a dependent variable, a significant difference (p</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:12:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:12:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau International Beta Tau Chapteren_GB
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