2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154696
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Elements of Critical Thinking: Directives for Nursing Education
Abstract:
Elements of Critical Thinking: Directives for Nursing Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Cook, Patricia
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Carolina-Aiken
Objective: To explore the meaning and process of critical thinking. This study investigated the presence and perceived effectiveness of critical thinking in a representative sample of student nurses and registered nurses. Design: To address the purpose of this research, qualitative methodology was selected. A case study design was used for knowledge discovery. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A purposive sample was identified: 10 senior nursing students with a grade point average of 3.0 or higher and 10 registered nurses with three years or less nursing experience. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The concept of critical thinking was the focus of this study. Methods: Participants were asked to read a client scenario and respond "aloud" to six questions about the sample client. Probing was used to clarify and expand participants' discussions. Interviews were audio taped for later analysis. A constant comparative method of inductive analysis was used in the identification of categories of data units. Analysis was aided by the computer program The Ethnograph. Findings: After completing the data analysis, 10 elements of critical thinking were revealed--seeks knowledge, seeks thought organization, sets priority, questions self, identifies need for action, networking, correlates causality, draws conclusion, maturity/experience, and holism. All of the registered nurses used the identified elements; student nurses used all but the "networking" element. Conclusions: Sample students and registered nurses were effectively using critical thinking in their clinical problems solving and elements of critical thinking could be identified. Implications: Knowledge and understanding of critical thinking elements provide guidance for nursing education in the admission of nursing students and in curriculum development. Also, agencies hiring registered nurses have an enhanced understanding of the process of critical thinking and are better able to identify activities that promote the continued development of critical thinking.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleElements of Critical Thinking: Directives for Nursing Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154696-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Elements of Critical Thinking: Directives for Nursing Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cook, Patricia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Carolina-Aiken</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pattic@aiken.sc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To explore the meaning and process of critical thinking. This study investigated the presence and perceived effectiveness of critical thinking in a representative sample of student nurses and registered nurses. Design: To address the purpose of this research, qualitative methodology was selected. A case study design was used for knowledge discovery. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A purposive sample was identified: 10 senior nursing students with a grade point average of 3.0 or higher and 10 registered nurses with three years or less nursing experience. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The concept of critical thinking was the focus of this study. Methods: Participants were asked to read a client scenario and respond &quot;aloud&quot; to six questions about the sample client. Probing was used to clarify and expand participants' discussions. Interviews were audio taped for later analysis. A constant comparative method of inductive analysis was used in the identification of categories of data units. Analysis was aided by the computer program The Ethnograph. Findings: After completing the data analysis, 10 elements of critical thinking were revealed--seeks knowledge, seeks thought organization, sets priority, questions self, identifies need for action, networking, correlates causality, draws conclusion, maturity/experience, and holism. All of the registered nurses used the identified elements; student nurses used all but the &quot;networking&quot; element. Conclusions: Sample students and registered nurses were effectively using critical thinking in their clinical problems solving and elements of critical thinking could be identified. Implications: Knowledge and understanding of critical thinking elements provide guidance for nursing education in the admission of nursing students and in curriculum development. Also, agencies hiring registered nurses have an enhanced understanding of the process of critical thinking and are better able to identify activities that promote the continued development of critical thinking.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:12:17Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:12:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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