Impact of Demographics, Functional Status & Comorbidity on BSE Proficiency in Older Black Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154697
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Demographics, Functional Status & Comorbidity on BSE Proficiency in Older Black Women
Abstract:
Impact of Demographics, Functional Status & Comorbidity on BSE Proficiency in Older Black Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Duffy, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Boston College
Title:Professor
Objective: To understand how demographics, functional status and comorbidity influence breast self-examination proficiency in older Black women in the United States; and To learn how study results relate to previous research in the area of older women’s breast self-examination proficiency. Despite a lower incidence of breast cancer, mortality rates are higher in Black women than in White counterparts. Abundant research suggests lower screening rates related to socioeconomic factors among Black women are more influential than biological factors in producing death from breast cancer. The objective of the study, using a health belief model framework, was to determine if selected demographics, functional status and comorbidity significantly influence breast self-examination (BSE) proficiency in older Black women in the United States. Methods. Design. Sample. In this descriptive-correlational study, the sample, a subset of a larger US federally-funded study, consisted of 246 Black women whose average age was 7l + 8.8 years. The majority were widowed (54%), with less than 11 years of education (50%) & an annual income between $7,000 & $9,900. Findings. The objective was achieved by canonical correlational analysis. The demographics (age, education, income, marital status, cognitive status, health status), functional status & comorbidity formed the predictor set. Breast cancer screening knowledge, BSE inspection/palpation skills & detection of breast lumps in simulated models formed the dependent set. Two significant canonical variate pairs emerged. CANVAR 1, with 39% redundancy, indicated that older, not currently married, Black women with less education & income, lower cognitive functioning & functional status were more likely to have lower breast cancer screening knowledge, BSE inspection/palpation & lump detection scores than their counterparts. CANVAR 2, with 15% redundancy, suggested that older Black women with less education but better health status, functional status & less comorbidity were more likely to have higher BSE inspection/palpation scores but lower breast cancer screening knowledge & lump detection scores than their counterparts. The total amount of explained variance for the two canonical variate pairs was 54%. Conclusions & Implications: Study findings provide new information about the interrelated factors that influence BSE proficiency in older Black women in the United States and they support findings in several earlier studies. Additionally, study results point to the need for more research on the BSE proficiency of underrepresented & socioeconomically disadvantaged groups in American society. Future studies are needed to improve our understanding of breast cancer screening practices in older age groups.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Demographics, Functional Status & Comorbidity on BSE Proficiency in Older Black Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154697-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of Demographics, Functional Status &amp; Comorbidity on BSE Proficiency in Older Black Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Duffy, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boston College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">duffy@bc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To understand how demographics, functional status and comorbidity influence breast self-examination proficiency in older Black women in the United States; and To learn how study results relate to previous research in the area of older women&rsquo;s breast self-examination proficiency. Despite a lower incidence of breast cancer, mortality rates are higher in Black women than in White counterparts. Abundant research suggests lower screening rates related to socioeconomic factors among Black women are more influential than biological factors in producing death from breast cancer. The objective of the study, using a health belief model framework, was to determine if selected demographics, functional status and comorbidity significantly influence breast self-examination (BSE) proficiency in older Black women in the United States. Methods. Design. Sample. In this descriptive-correlational study, the sample, a subset of a larger US federally-funded study, consisted of 246 Black women whose average age was 7l + 8.8 years. The majority were widowed (54%), with less than 11 years of education (50%) &amp; an annual income between $7,000 &amp; $9,900. Findings. The objective was achieved by canonical correlational analysis. The demographics (age, education, income, marital status, cognitive status, health status), functional status &amp; comorbidity formed the predictor set. Breast cancer screening knowledge, BSE inspection/palpation skills &amp; detection of breast lumps in simulated models formed the dependent set. Two significant canonical variate pairs emerged. CANVAR 1, with 39% redundancy, indicated that older, not currently married, Black women with less education &amp; income, lower cognitive functioning &amp; functional status were more likely to have lower breast cancer screening knowledge, BSE inspection/palpation &amp; lump detection scores than their counterparts. CANVAR 2, with 15% redundancy, suggested that older Black women with less education but better health status, functional status &amp; less comorbidity were more likely to have higher BSE inspection/palpation scores but lower breast cancer screening knowledge &amp; lump detection scores than their counterparts. The total amount of explained variance for the two canonical variate pairs was 54%. Conclusions &amp; Implications: Study findings provide new information about the interrelated factors that influence BSE proficiency in older Black women in the United States and they support findings in several earlier studies. Additionally, study results point to the need for more research on the BSE proficiency of underrepresented &amp; socioeconomically disadvantaged groups in American society. Future studies are needed to improve our understanding of breast cancer screening practices in older age groups.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:12:20Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:12:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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