2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154699
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Computer Health Information Network: Views of Professionals and Consumers
Abstract:
Computer Health Information Network: Views of Professionals and Consumers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Ervin, Naomi, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Binghamton University
Objective: Sharing information about clients by computer may enhance the exchange of information across health care agencies. A study was designed to assess a community’s readiness to accept and use a computer-based health information network. Design: An exploratory design was used to collect data. Sample: A purposive sample was chosen to represent some of the major groups who would be users of the health information network. Study participants were invited from two counties over three months during 2000. The groups consisted of attorneys (5), physicians (4), members of a home care coalition composed of various types of agencies providing care in the community (3), and two groups of consumers (n=16). Ages of participants ranged from the 40’s to over 80. Incomes ranged from under $10,000 to over $40,000 per year. Variables: No variables were identified a priori since this study was exploratory in design. Methods: Focus groups were conducted in five sites in two different counties. Since both counties are rural by the definition used by the state, the study was designed to reach people in the settings where they were comfortable, e.g., county libraries, a hospital. Findings: Twenty-four of the 25 participants had access to computers and used them to varying extents. Some individuals used the computer from first arrival at work until night. The most common uses were Internet searches, word processing, e-mail, databases, and photographs (both personal and for litigation). Participants reported 17 other uses made of the computer. Physicians reported the greatest use and enthusiasm for use of the computer. They were supportive of having patients provide information about themselves to the extent they feel comfortable. The attorneys agreed that having information about a client would assist them in solving problems, but they would advise clients to share very little information about themselves on the Internet. Consumers fell in between physicians and attorneys in their trust in sharing information about themselves. The consumers expressed a desire to have information in order to evaluate providers’ performance. The home care coalition members were most interested in sharing information about clients in order to avoid duplication and to speed up the process of providing care. All participant groups expressed concern about security of information entered into a computer. Conclusions: The comfort level of all participants with computer technology was high. Physicians were the most enthusiastic about the possibility of a health care network. Each group, however, was supportive of establishment of a network and could see uses for themselves. Implications: The participants in the five focus groups were by no means a true representative sample of the population in the two counties, but they provided adequate support to encourage movement for the next step toward establishing a computer network. The committee of volunteer agency members who conducted this study will pursue funding for a consumer information network as the next step.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComputer Health Information Network: Views of Professionals and Consumersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154699-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Computer Health Information Network: Views of Professionals and Consumers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ervin, Naomi, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Binghamton University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nerving@Binghamton.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Sharing information about clients by computer may enhance the exchange of information across health care agencies. A study was designed to assess a community&rsquo;s readiness to accept and use a computer-based health information network. Design: An exploratory design was used to collect data. Sample: A purposive sample was chosen to represent some of the major groups who would be users of the health information network. Study participants were invited from two counties over three months during 2000. The groups consisted of attorneys (5), physicians (4), members of a home care coalition composed of various types of agencies providing care in the community (3), and two groups of consumers (n=16). Ages of participants ranged from the 40&rsquo;s to over 80. Incomes ranged from under $10,000 to over $40,000 per year. Variables: No variables were identified a priori since this study was exploratory in design. Methods: Focus groups were conducted in five sites in two different counties. Since both counties are rural by the definition used by the state, the study was designed to reach people in the settings where they were comfortable, e.g., county libraries, a hospital. Findings: Twenty-four of the 25 participants had access to computers and used them to varying extents. Some individuals used the computer from first arrival at work until night. The most common uses were Internet searches, word processing, e-mail, databases, and photographs (both personal and for litigation). Participants reported 17 other uses made of the computer. Physicians reported the greatest use and enthusiasm for use of the computer. They were supportive of having patients provide information about themselves to the extent they feel comfortable. The attorneys agreed that having information about a client would assist them in solving problems, but they would advise clients to share very little information about themselves on the Internet. Consumers fell in between physicians and attorneys in their trust in sharing information about themselves. The consumers expressed a desire to have information in order to evaluate providers&rsquo; performance. The home care coalition members were most interested in sharing information about clients in order to avoid duplication and to speed up the process of providing care. All participant groups expressed concern about security of information entered into a computer. Conclusions: The comfort level of all participants with computer technology was high. Physicians were the most enthusiastic about the possibility of a health care network. Each group, however, was supportive of establishment of a network and could see uses for themselves. Implications: The participants in the five focus groups were by no means a true representative sample of the population in the two counties, but they provided adequate support to encourage movement for the next step toward establishing a computer network. The committee of volunteer agency members who conducted this study will pursue funding for a consumer information network as the next step.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:12:26Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:12:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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