The Best Predictors of Use of Home Health Care and Home Support Services Over Time

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154700
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Best Predictors of Use of Home Health Care and Home Support Services Over Time
Abstract:
The Best Predictors of Use of Home Health Care and Home Support Services Over Time
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Forbes, Dorothy
P.I. Institution Name:University of Saskatchewan
Over the past decade, increased pressures have been placed on Canadian home care programs. Programs have responded by attempting to meet the more pressing needs of short-term, post-acute clients that have resulted in less capacity to serve long-term clients. This has resulted in programs cutting or reducing home support services that may have a range of implications for family members and/or other informal caregivers. Objective: To determine which predisposing, enabling, and need factors are best correlated with overall use of home care, use of the home health services (e.g., nursing), and use of home support services (e.g., housework, personal care, meal preparation) in 1994/95, in 1996/97, and 1998/99. Design: Andersen and Newman’s (1973) health services utilization model was used as the theoretical framework that guided the design and interpretation of this research. The relationships between the predisposing, enabling, and need factors and home care use in community-dwelling Canadians, 18 years of age and over, in 1994/95, 1996/97, and 1998/99 are described and compared. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The target population of the National Population Health Surveys (NPHS) included household residents in all provinces excluding populations on Indian Reserves, Canadian Forces Bases, and some remote areas in Quebec and Ontario. The sample sizes were 17,626 in 1994/95, 81,804 in 1996/97, and 17,244 in 1998/99. Variables Studied: The independent predisposing variables that influence the use of home care included: age, gender, and living arrangement. The enabling factors included: education, income levels, availability of informal support, and sense of coherence and the need factors included restriction of activities, perceived health, number of overnight hospitalizations, and number and type of chronic conditions. The dependent variable, use of home care services, was measured in terms of frequency of use and types of services (e.g., home health services: nursing; and home support services: housework, personal care, and meal preparation). Analyses: The planned data analyses entailed a multi-stage process consisting of data description, bivariate, and multivariate analyses using SPSS 10.0 for Windows TM. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the associations of the independent variables with home care use. Findings: Preliminary findings reveal an increase in the numbers of Canadians who use home care, an increase in the proportion of professional home health services, an increase in personal care assistance, and a decrease in homemaking services over time. Females, older adults, those who are single, living alone, have lower income and less education are more likely to receive home care. However, males, those under 65 years of age, those who live with others, and have higher incomes are more likely to receive nursing services. Implications: Identifying the best predictors of use of home health care and home support services will assist decision-makers in targeting funding and services to those who will most benefit from these services over the short- and long-term.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Best Predictors of Use of Home Health Care and Home Support Services Over Timeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154700-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Best Predictors of Use of Home Health Care and Home Support Services Over Time</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Forbes, Dorothy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Saskatchewan</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dorothy.forbes@usask.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Over the past decade, increased pressures have been placed on Canadian home care programs. Programs have responded by attempting to meet the more pressing needs of short-term, post-acute clients that have resulted in less capacity to serve long-term clients. This has resulted in programs cutting or reducing home support services that may have a range of implications for family members and/or other informal caregivers. Objective: To determine which predisposing, enabling, and need factors are best correlated with overall use of home care, use of the home health services (e.g., nursing), and use of home support services (e.g., housework, personal care, meal preparation) in 1994/95, in 1996/97, and 1998/99. Design: Andersen and Newman&rsquo;s (1973) health services utilization model was used as the theoretical framework that guided the design and interpretation of this research. The relationships between the predisposing, enabling, and need factors and home care use in community-dwelling Canadians, 18 years of age and over, in 1994/95, 1996/97, and 1998/99 are described and compared. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The target population of the National Population Health Surveys (NPHS) included household residents in all provinces excluding populations on Indian Reserves, Canadian Forces Bases, and some remote areas in Quebec and Ontario. The sample sizes were 17,626 in 1994/95, 81,804 in 1996/97, and 17,244 in 1998/99. Variables Studied: The independent predisposing variables that influence the use of home care included: age, gender, and living arrangement. The enabling factors included: education, income levels, availability of informal support, and sense of coherence and the need factors included restriction of activities, perceived health, number of overnight hospitalizations, and number and type of chronic conditions. The dependent variable, use of home care services, was measured in terms of frequency of use and types of services (e.g., home health services: nursing; and home support services: housework, personal care, and meal preparation). Analyses: The planned data analyses entailed a multi-stage process consisting of data description, bivariate, and multivariate analyses using SPSS 10.0 for Windows TM. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the associations of the independent variables with home care use. Findings: Preliminary findings reveal an increase in the numbers of Canadians who use home care, an increase in the proportion of professional home health services, an increase in personal care assistance, and a decrease in homemaking services over time. Females, older adults, those who are single, living alone, have lower income and less education are more likely to receive home care. However, males, those under 65 years of age, those who live with others, and have higher incomes are more likely to receive nursing services. Implications: Identifying the best predictors of use of home health care and home support services will assist decision-makers in targeting funding and services to those who will most benefit from these services over the short- and long-term.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:12:29Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:12:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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