2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154701
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adaptation to Cancer
Abstract:
Adaptation to Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Massey, Veta, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Baptist College of Health Sciences
Title:Dean
The purpose of this study was to a) identify contributions to nursing science from research utilizing the Adaptation to Chronic Illness model with adults who have cancer requiring aggressive treatment and to b) increase awareness of the implications for nursing practice from research findings on patients’ response to cancer. Forty-five patients were tested as they entered into Phase II clinical trial chemotherapy treatment program. Data were collected over two years of using the APACHE II to measure actual physiological status; the Symptom Distress Profile to measure perceived effects of discomfort and the Sickness Impact Profile to measure perceived effect of cancer on psychosocial adaptation. The sample consisted of 25 men and 20 women with an average age of 45 who were predominately white. They were well educated with %60 having completed at least some college or a college degree. The result supported the theoretical predictions that perception of symptoms is positively correlated psychosocial adaptation (r=0.60; p=< .001) and not with actual physiological status. In addition, perception of symptoms (p=<.006) and psychosocial adaptation (p=<.04) were associated with survival at six months and not with actual physiological status. The study provided support for the Adaptation to Chronic Illness model. The effect of perception on adaptation and variable that predicted adaptation to cancer in both the physiologic and psychosocial domains was validated. Implications for nursing practice include the need for evaluating perception of the illness prior to interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdaptation to Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154701-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adaptation to Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Massey, Veta, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Baptist College of Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">veta.massey@bmhcc.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to a) identify contributions to nursing science from research utilizing the Adaptation to Chronic Illness model with adults who have cancer requiring aggressive treatment and to b) increase awareness of the implications for nursing practice from research findings on patients&rsquo; response to cancer. Forty-five patients were tested as they entered into Phase II clinical trial chemotherapy treatment program. Data were collected over two years of using the APACHE II to measure actual physiological status; the Symptom Distress Profile to measure perceived effects of discomfort and the Sickness Impact Profile to measure perceived effect of cancer on psychosocial adaptation. The sample consisted of 25 men and 20 women with an average age of 45 who were predominately white. They were well educated with %60 having completed at least some college or a college degree. The result supported the theoretical predictions that perception of symptoms is positively correlated psychosocial adaptation (r=0.60; p=&lt; .001) and not with actual physiological status. In addition, perception of symptoms (p=&lt;.006) and psychosocial adaptation (p=&lt;.04) were associated with survival at six months and not with actual physiological status. The study provided support for the Adaptation to Chronic Illness model. The effect of perception on adaptation and variable that predicted adaptation to cancer in both the physiologic and psychosocial domains was validated. Implications for nursing practice include the need for evaluating perception of the illness prior to interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:12:32Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:12:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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