2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154702
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adaptation to Chronic Cardiac Illness
Abstract:
Adaptation to Chronic Cardiac Illness
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Velasco-Whetsell, Martha
The purpose of this study was expanded the knowledge base regarding cardiac patients’ adaptation to illness. The framework for the study was the Roy Adaptation Model (RAM), which links physiological and psychosocial phenomena affecting adaptation during a physiological illness. Data on 44 cardiac patients has been collected and analyzed at six week and six month intervals following a life-threatening cardiac episode. Each patient completes: The Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Self-Report scale (adaptation to illness), The Personal Resource Questionnaire (social support), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (anxiety) and a Perception of Physiological Status scale. Patients were rated for their Functional/Therapeutic Level and audiotapes analyzed for anxiety using voice spectography. Data on 29 males and 15 females ranging in age from 27 to 84 were analyzed. A casual model derived from the RAM predicted that physiological status (perceived), social support, anxiety and functional/therapeutic level directly affect adaptation to illness. There were one set of equations for each of the following factors: physiological status (perceived), social support, functional/therapeutic level and anxiety correlated with adaptation to illness (.001) and an inverse relationship was found between social support and adaptation to illness (.01). It appears that anxiety may serve as a motivator for adaptation to illness. There is also a suggestion that anxiety reduces the perception of social support. Whether the individual perceives that social support is not available or whether anxiety and its manifestations serve as a deterrent to one’s support system is not clear. There was no relationship between patient perception of physical status and functional/therapeutic level or between functional/therapeutic level and adaptation to illness. Coupled with the significant relationship between perception of physical status and adaptation to illness, these findings provide further support for previous research on the power of perceptions about the physical self. It again appears that adaptation to and outcomes of illness are determined by perceptions rather than actual physical status or observed functional status.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdaptation to Chronic Cardiac Illnessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154702-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adaptation to Chronic Cardiac Illness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Velasco-Whetsell, Martha</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">m.v.w@internet.com.mx</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was expanded the knowledge base regarding cardiac patients&rsquo; adaptation to illness. The framework for the study was the Roy Adaptation Model (RAM), which links physiological and psychosocial phenomena affecting adaptation during a physiological illness. Data on 44 cardiac patients has been collected and analyzed at six week and six month intervals following a life-threatening cardiac episode. Each patient completes: The Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Self-Report scale (adaptation to illness), The Personal Resource Questionnaire (social support), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (anxiety) and a Perception of Physiological Status scale. Patients were rated for their Functional/Therapeutic Level and audiotapes analyzed for anxiety using voice spectography. Data on 29 males and 15 females ranging in age from 27 to 84 were analyzed. A casual model derived from the RAM predicted that physiological status (perceived), social support, anxiety and functional/therapeutic level directly affect adaptation to illness. There were one set of equations for each of the following factors: physiological status (perceived), social support, functional/therapeutic level and anxiety correlated with adaptation to illness (.001) and an inverse relationship was found between social support and adaptation to illness (.01). It appears that anxiety may serve as a motivator for adaptation to illness. There is also a suggestion that anxiety reduces the perception of social support. Whether the individual perceives that social support is not available or whether anxiety and its manifestations serve as a deterrent to one&rsquo;s support system is not clear. There was no relationship between patient perception of physical status and functional/therapeutic level or between functional/therapeutic level and adaptation to illness. Coupled with the significant relationship between perception of physical status and adaptation to illness, these findings provide further support for previous research on the power of perceptions about the physical self. It again appears that adaptation to and outcomes of illness are determined by perceptions rather than actual physical status or observed functional status.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:12:35Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:12:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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