2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154704
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Graduate Nursing Debate
Abstract:
The Graduate Nursing Debate
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Green, Barbara
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wales-Swansea
Objective: This paper is concerned with research on the impact of undergraduate and postgraduate education on the lives and practice of nurses. Design: The Methodological approach used in the study has its origins in phenomenology and was influenced by Gadamerian hermeneutics. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The subjects represent a convenience sample of students following programmes of study ranging from undergraduate to doctoral studies. They were predominantly part-time students from general and specialist practice working in hospital or community settings. They were all associated with a Health Science department in a British University. The research was conducted in the year 2000. Concept Studied: Undergraduate and postgraduate education for registered nurses. Methods: The data collection methods comprised 19 semi-structured interviews, two focus groups and reflective notes. Findings: A number of stories were discernible from the analysis of the data. The most prominent of these centered on a model whereby the academic growth attained by the participants impacted on their personal growth, professional competence and the development of nursing knowledge. This was in turn directly and indirectly related to the care of patients. Conclusions: The findings from this research indicate that nurses would benefit from an academic education and for some this would be at doctoral level. This would enable nurses to achieve the goal of evidence based practice and equip them with the skills and knowledge to make a significant contribution to the development of nursing knowledge, health care policy, strategic planning and delivery of care. There is an indication that there should be a close interface with clinical practice and that nursing education should be university based but be embedded in practice. Implications: A better-educated nursing workforce will provide the skills and knowledge the nurses themselves have identified they need to be effective in their work. It is hoped that this paper will stimulate further discussion in a wider research community on the issue of graduate nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Graduate Nursing Debateen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154704-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Graduate Nursing Debate</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Green, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wales-Swansea</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">b.green@swansea.ac.uk</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This paper is concerned with research on the impact of undergraduate and postgraduate education on the lives and practice of nurses. Design: The Methodological approach used in the study has its origins in phenomenology and was influenced by Gadamerian hermeneutics. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The subjects represent a convenience sample of students following programmes of study ranging from undergraduate to doctoral studies. They were predominantly part-time students from general and specialist practice working in hospital or community settings. They were all associated with a Health Science department in a British University. The research was conducted in the year 2000. Concept Studied: Undergraduate and postgraduate education for registered nurses. Methods: The data collection methods comprised 19 semi-structured interviews, two focus groups and reflective notes. Findings: A number of stories were discernible from the analysis of the data. The most prominent of these centered on a model whereby the academic growth attained by the participants impacted on their personal growth, professional competence and the development of nursing knowledge. This was in turn directly and indirectly related to the care of patients. Conclusions: The findings from this research indicate that nurses would benefit from an academic education and for some this would be at doctoral level. This would enable nurses to achieve the goal of evidence based practice and equip them with the skills and knowledge to make a significant contribution to the development of nursing knowledge, health care policy, strategic planning and delivery of care. There is an indication that there should be a close interface with clinical practice and that nursing education should be university based but be embedded in practice. Implications: A better-educated nursing workforce will provide the skills and knowledge the nurses themselves have identified they need to be effective in their work. It is hoped that this paper will stimulate further discussion in a wider research community on the issue of graduate nurses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:12:40Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:12:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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