Using Focus Groups to Assure Content Validity The Military Nursing Moral Distress Scale

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154706
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Focus Groups to Assure Content Validity The Military Nursing Moral Distress Scale
Abstract:
Using Focus Groups to Assure Content Validity The Military Nursing Moral Distress Scale
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Harvey, Rose
P.I. Institution Name:Northeastern University
Objective: The overall objective of the project is to prevent moral distress in military nurses during crisis deployments. Aims of the study are to: (1) identify the phenomenon of moral distress in military nurses’ stories about patient care in crisis deployment situations, (2) describe the dimensions of the moral distress process in military nurses’ stories, and (3) develop and evaluate a scale to measure moral distress in military nurses. In order to enhance scale development and assure the content validity, we used focus group (FG) discussions with military nurses who were crisis deployed, as well as nurse experts in moral distress and ethics. Design: Two FGs were used to: (a) provide interpretive and theoretical validity of the qualitative data used in scale development, and (b) provide adjunct support to the more commonly used quantitative methods of assessing content validity. Sample: FG participants were experts in the context being studied, i.e., nurse officers who had been deployed in a military crisis situation, or experts in moral distress or ethics. Participants in the first group included three military nurse officers, one with expertise in ethics, and two other nurse experts in ethics and moral distress. Participants in the second FG included eight members of a U. S. Army Nurse Corps Reserve unit. Concept Framework: The study was guided by a conceptual model of moral distress derived from previous research and a review of the literature. Moral distress was defined as the negative balance between a nurse's moral judgment and the opportunity to implement that judgment in nursing action. A model of the moral distress process was developed from nurses’ moral distress stories. Methods: Two FGs were conducted. Potential participants were informed that participation was voluntary, discussions would be tape recorded, and confidentiality was protected. Confidentiality and ground rules of the FG participation were discussed prior to the FG sessions. Participants were asked whether: (1) they agreed with the researchers’ interpretation of the interview data as provided in the survey items, (2) items were clearly stated, and (3) items were relevant to the domain label and definitions provided. Discussions were tape recorded and transcribed. The transcription and item summaries were reviewed by the research team and decisions were made about retaining or deleting items based on FG discussion and researchers’ review. Results: Participants identified items that portrayed common situations and were good examples of moral distress experiences. They suggested rephrasing items to more clearly convey the experiences. Participants also described additional situations that were troublesome to them in their clinical practice during deployment, enabling researchers to develop new items. In addition, participants made suggestions for item placement in the domains of moral distress. Conclusions: FGs involving military nurse officers and civilian nurse ethics experts enhanced the content validity assessment of the scale and provided useful feedback to the researchers. A subsequent Content Validity Index for item clarity and domain relevance resulted in further changes and a CVI of 0.90. Participation of ethicists and nurse officers provided additional points of view including that of civilian practice. Implications: FGs provide an effective adjunct to quantitative judgment of content validity. Careful planning and conduct of FGs can result in increased knowledge and assurance of content validity in scale development.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Focus Groups to Assure Content Validity The Military Nursing Moral Distress Scaleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154706-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Focus Groups to Assure Content Validity The Military Nursing Moral Distress Scale</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harvey, Rose</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northeastern University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">r.harvey@nunet.neu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The overall objective of the project is to prevent moral distress in military nurses during crisis deployments. Aims of the study are to: (1) identify the phenomenon of moral distress in military nurses&rsquo; stories about patient care in crisis deployment situations, (2) describe the dimensions of the moral distress process in military nurses&rsquo; stories, and (3) develop and evaluate a scale to measure moral distress in military nurses. In order to enhance scale development and assure the content validity, we used focus group (FG) discussions with military nurses who were crisis deployed, as well as nurse experts in moral distress and ethics. Design: Two FGs were used to: (a) provide interpretive and theoretical validity of the qualitative data used in scale development, and (b) provide adjunct support to the more commonly used quantitative methods of assessing content validity. Sample: FG participants were experts in the context being studied, i.e., nurse officers who had been deployed in a military crisis situation, or experts in moral distress or ethics. Participants in the first group included three military nurse officers, one with expertise in ethics, and two other nurse experts in ethics and moral distress. Participants in the second FG included eight members of a U. S. Army Nurse Corps Reserve unit. Concept Framework: The study was guided by a conceptual model of moral distress derived from previous research and a review of the literature. Moral distress was defined as the negative balance between a nurse's moral judgment and the opportunity to implement that judgment in nursing action. A model of the moral distress process was developed from nurses&rsquo; moral distress stories. Methods: Two FGs were conducted. Potential participants were informed that participation was voluntary, discussions would be tape recorded, and confidentiality was protected. Confidentiality and ground rules of the FG participation were discussed prior to the FG sessions. Participants were asked whether: (1) they agreed with the researchers&rsquo; interpretation of the interview data as provided in the survey items, (2) items were clearly stated, and (3) items were relevant to the domain label and definitions provided. Discussions were tape recorded and transcribed. The transcription and item summaries were reviewed by the research team and decisions were made about retaining or deleting items based on FG discussion and researchers&rsquo; review. Results: Participants identified items that portrayed common situations and were good examples of moral distress experiences. They suggested rephrasing items to more clearly convey the experiences. Participants also described additional situations that were troublesome to them in their clinical practice during deployment, enabling researchers to develop new items. In addition, participants made suggestions for item placement in the domains of moral distress. Conclusions: FGs involving military nurse officers and civilian nurse ethics experts enhanced the content validity assessment of the scale and provided useful feedback to the researchers. A subsequent Content Validity Index for item clarity and domain relevance resulted in further changes and a CVI of 0.90. Participation of ethicists and nurse officers provided additional points of view including that of civilian practice. Implications: FGs provide an effective adjunct to quantitative judgment of content validity. Careful planning and conduct of FGs can result in increased knowledge and assurance of content validity in scale development.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:12:46Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:12:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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