Parental Concerns for the Child with Febrile Convulsion: Long-term Effects of Educational Interventions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154708
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parental Concerns for the Child with Febrile Convulsion: Long-term Effects of Educational Interventions
Abstract:
Parental Concerns for the Child with Febrile Convulsion: Long-term Effects of Educational Interventions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Huang, Mei-Chih
Objective: To evaluate long-term effects of educational interventions on parental concerns for children with febrile convulsions (FC). Design: A quasi-experimental design was conducted to compare the effectiveness of a mailed pamphlet and a two-hour educational program for parents of FC children. Subjects, Years: Between August 1995 and July 1996, children with FC who visited one of eight major referral hospitals and three outpatient clinics located in southern Taiwan were recruited. A number of 209 FC parents were recruited and assigned into program or pamphlet groups by their choices. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire included demographic characteristics and parental concerns was mailed to examine the parental concerns at four time points: prior to the interventions, three months, one year, and two years after the interventions. The items related to parental concerns included ten questions on a five-point Likert scale with a “non-applicable” response choice. The parental response was given a score with 5 being highest concern, and 1 lowest. The reliability of internal consistency was tested by computing Cronbach’s coefficient alpha, and was 0.88 for the parental concern section. Differences of parental concern scores at the four different time points between and within pamphlet and program groups were evaluated by the Student t test, the paired t test, and ANCOVA. In order to compare the changes in the patterns of parental concerns over time, the Mixed-Effect Model was chosen for analysis. Findings: The scores of parental concerns were high before the interventions. Parents concerned that their child is apt to get a fever, has further seizures in the night, that FC results in potential brain damage and is life threatening. After interventions the concern scores were significantly lower for the program group than for the pamphlet group. The educational program was the most significant factor that influenced the change in parental concerns. The recurrence of FC did not significantly influence the change in the concern trajectory in the program group but showed a significant difference in the pamphlet group. Conclusions: FC Parental concerns decreased as time passed particularly in the program group. The educational program was the significant factor that influenced the change of concern trajectories, and the recurrent/non-recurrent factor influenced the change of concern only in pamphlet group. Implications: The timing and content of the educational interventions were the important issues for care of FC children and their parents. For the greatest benefit from the educational interventions, parental concerns about their FC children should be assessed, information and emotional support provided, and first aid for seizure demonstrated and rehearsed after initial FC and in the follow-up stages.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParental Concerns for the Child with Febrile Convulsion: Long-term Effects of Educational Interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154708-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parental Concerns for the Child with Febrile Convulsion: Long-term Effects of Educational Interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Huang, Mei-Chih</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">meay@mail.ncku.edu.tw</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To evaluate long-term effects of educational interventions on parental concerns for children with febrile convulsions (FC). Design: A quasi-experimental design was conducted to compare the effectiveness of a mailed pamphlet and a two-hour educational program for parents of FC children. Subjects, Years: Between August 1995 and July 1996, children with FC who visited one of eight major referral hospitals and three outpatient clinics located in southern Taiwan were recruited. A number of 209 FC parents were recruited and assigned into program or pamphlet groups by their choices. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire included demographic characteristics and parental concerns was mailed to examine the parental concerns at four time points: prior to the interventions, three months, one year, and two years after the interventions. The items related to parental concerns included ten questions on a five-point Likert scale with a &ldquo;non-applicable&rdquo; response choice. The parental response was given a score with 5 being highest concern, and 1 lowest. The reliability of internal consistency was tested by computing Cronbach&rsquo;s coefficient alpha, and was 0.88 for the parental concern section. Differences of parental concern scores at the four different time points between and within pamphlet and program groups were evaluated by the Student t test, the paired t test, and ANCOVA. In order to compare the changes in the patterns of parental concerns over time, the Mixed-Effect Model was chosen for analysis. Findings: The scores of parental concerns were high before the interventions. Parents concerned that their child is apt to get a fever, has further seizures in the night, that FC results in potential brain damage and is life threatening. After interventions the concern scores were significantly lower for the program group than for the pamphlet group. The educational program was the most significant factor that influenced the change in parental concerns. The recurrence of FC did not significantly influence the change in the concern trajectory in the program group but showed a significant difference in the pamphlet group. Conclusions: FC Parental concerns decreased as time passed particularly in the program group. The educational program was the significant factor that influenced the change of concern trajectories, and the recurrent/non-recurrent factor influenced the change of concern only in pamphlet group. Implications: The timing and content of the educational interventions were the important issues for care of FC children and their parents. For the greatest benefit from the educational interventions, parental concerns about their FC children should be assessed, information and emotional support provided, and first aid for seizure demonstrated and rehearsed after initial FC and in the follow-up stages.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:12:52Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:12:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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