The other side of the pill bottle: The lived experience of HIV+ nurses on HIV combination drug therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154710
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The other side of the pill bottle: The lived experience of HIV+ nurses on HIV combination drug therapy
Abstract:
The other side of the pill bottle: The lived experience of HIV+ nurses on HIV combination drug therapy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Jones, Sande, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Florida International University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: Non-adherence to HIV drug therapy has been noted as a reason for treatment failure in HIV+ patients/clients (Altice & Friedland, 1998). Greater adherence with HIV medication therapy might be achieved with a better understanding of the factors associated with medication adherence (Samet et al., 1992). A study funded by STTI/Glaxo Wellcome explored the experience of daily HIV medication taking by HIV+ persons, including two health care providers (Jones & Brown, 1999). Unlike the other participants, the health care providers had developed strategies over time that facilitated successful medication adherence. A review of the literature found no studies that described the experience of HIV+ nurses, either related to the experience of being HIV+ or the experience of taking HIV medications. To gain a better understanding of factors relating to HIV medication adherence, a qualitative study of nine HIV+ nurses was conducted to explore the experience of daily life taking HIV combination drug therapy. The study gave voice to a group of nurses who have been nearly “invisible” in the literature. Design: Descriptive phenomenology. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The study sample was nine HIV+ nurses, three women and six men, from different regions of the United States. Ages ranged from 28 to 52 years of age. All of the participants considered themselves to be doing well in terms of their HIV as an illness. Three nurses stated they had acquired HIV from an occupational exposure; one nurse had acquired HIV from a contaminated blood product used to treat his hemophilia; and five nurses had acquired HIV through sexual transmission. The nurses had been on a variety of HIV combination drug therapies. Study years were 1999-2000. Concept or Variables Studied Together: HIV medication adherence; HIV+ nurses. Methods: The study was implemented using an integrated method for conducting phenomenological research (Boyd, 1993; Moustakas, 1994). The research question was “What is it like, on a day-to-day basis, to take HIV combination drug therapy?” Face-to-face, in-depth interviews were conducted with each nurse. The interviews were taped and transcribed. The transcripts were analyzed using the method described by Moustakas (1994) for organizing and analyzing phenomenological data, to determine major themes and metaphors of the experience. Findings: Analysis of the nurses’ interviews revealed six major themes that described the experience of day-to-day life for HIV+ nurses on HIV combination drug therapy. The metaphor that emerged across the narratives was the Double Edged Sword of Being a Nurse on the Other Side, in the role of patient. The metaphor described the life-changing experience of being an HIV+ nurse attempting to adhere with the prescribed HIV combination drug regime. The experience was composed of six essential themes: becoming a patient; managing and being managed by the meds; coping with the meds; feeling lousy; negotiating the hassles and the cost; and living under a dark cloud; and three minor themes: serving as an advocate, keeping the secret, and I need a nurse. Conclusions: While several study findings were congruent with the literature, new components of the experience emerged. The experience of being an HIV+ nurse is complex and challenging, and requires further research to understand the experience, in order to provide effective support for these nurses. Implications: Implications for practice include the need for support and encouragement for persons on HIV combination drug therapy, to facilitate medication adherence, along with improved patient education materials that describe the potential effects/problems of combining HIV medications. Additionally, support and care must be provided for nurses who sustain a needlestick injury, including support when taking HIV medications for post-exposure prophylaxis. The side effects can be overwhelming and debilitating. All health care workers require a safe work environment that protects them from occupational exposure to HIV and Hepatitis C. Lastly, there is a need for HIV+ nurses to have their own support group or referral service, to provide them with the same support that they give to their patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe other side of the pill bottle: The lived experience of HIV+ nurses on HIV combination drug therapyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154710-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The other side of the pill bottle: The lived experience of HIV+ nurses on HIV combination drug therapy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Sande, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Florida International University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joness@fiu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Non-adherence to HIV drug therapy has been noted as a reason for treatment failure in HIV+ patients/clients (Altice &amp; Friedland, 1998). Greater adherence with HIV medication therapy might be achieved with a better understanding of the factors associated with medication adherence (Samet et al., 1992). A study funded by STTI/Glaxo Wellcome explored the experience of daily HIV medication taking by HIV+ persons, including two health care providers (Jones &amp; Brown, 1999). Unlike the other participants, the health care providers had developed strategies over time that facilitated successful medication adherence. A review of the literature found no studies that described the experience of HIV+ nurses, either related to the experience of being HIV+ or the experience of taking HIV medications. To gain a better understanding of factors relating to HIV medication adherence, a qualitative study of nine HIV+ nurses was conducted to explore the experience of daily life taking HIV combination drug therapy. The study gave voice to a group of nurses who have been nearly &ldquo;invisible&rdquo; in the literature. Design: Descriptive phenomenology. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The study sample was nine HIV+ nurses, three women and six men, from different regions of the United States. Ages ranged from 28 to 52 years of age. All of the participants considered themselves to be doing well in terms of their HIV as an illness. Three nurses stated they had acquired HIV from an occupational exposure; one nurse had acquired HIV from a contaminated blood product used to treat his hemophilia; and five nurses had acquired HIV through sexual transmission. The nurses had been on a variety of HIV combination drug therapies. Study years were 1999-2000. Concept or Variables Studied Together: HIV medication adherence; HIV+ nurses. Methods: The study was implemented using an integrated method for conducting phenomenological research (Boyd, 1993; Moustakas, 1994). The research question was &ldquo;What is it like, on a day-to-day basis, to take HIV combination drug therapy?&rdquo; Face-to-face, in-depth interviews were conducted with each nurse. The interviews were taped and transcribed. The transcripts were analyzed using the method described by Moustakas (1994) for organizing and analyzing phenomenological data, to determine major themes and metaphors of the experience. Findings: Analysis of the nurses&rsquo; interviews revealed six major themes that described the experience of day-to-day life for HIV+ nurses on HIV combination drug therapy. The metaphor that emerged across the narratives was the Double Edged Sword of Being a Nurse on the Other Side, in the role of patient. The metaphor described the life-changing experience of being an HIV+ nurse attempting to adhere with the prescribed HIV combination drug regime. The experience was composed of six essential themes: becoming a patient; managing and being managed by the meds; coping with the meds; feeling lousy; negotiating the hassles and the cost; and living under a dark cloud; and three minor themes: serving as an advocate, keeping the secret, and I need a nurse. Conclusions: While several study findings were congruent with the literature, new components of the experience emerged. The experience of being an HIV+ nurse is complex and challenging, and requires further research to understand the experience, in order to provide effective support for these nurses. Implications: Implications for practice include the need for support and encouragement for persons on HIV combination drug therapy, to facilitate medication adherence, along with improved patient education materials that describe the potential effects/problems of combining HIV medications. Additionally, support and care must be provided for nurses who sustain a needlestick injury, including support when taking HIV medications for post-exposure prophylaxis. The side effects can be overwhelming and debilitating. All health care workers require a safe work environment that protects them from occupational exposure to HIV and Hepatitis C. Lastly, there is a need for HIV+ nurses to have their own support group or referral service, to provide them with the same support that they give to their patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:12:58Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:12:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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