Severity of side effects, self-esteem, social support, and role adaptation of cervical cancer patients receiving radiation therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154711
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Severity of side effects, self-esteem, social support, and role adaptation of cervical cancer patients receiving radiation therapy
Abstract:
Severity of side effects, self-esteem, social support, and role adaptation of cervical cancer patients receiving radiation therapy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Kitrungrote, Luppana
P.I. Institution Name:Prince of Songkhla University
Objective: This study is aimed to describe role adaptation and to ascertain predictive power of severity of side effects, self-esteem, social support, and education on role adaptation of patients with cervical cancer receiving radiation. Design: A descriptive design was used. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The sample was comprised of 86 women recruited from the outpatient radiotherapy unit at six hospitals in Bangkok, Thailand, during February to June 2000. Women with cervical cancer who have the following criteria were included (1) were married and lived with their spouses, (2) had been receiving radiation (3,000cGy) at least for a 3-week period, (3) had no prior treatment with radiation or chemotherapy, (4) were able to understand and speak Thai, and (5) agreed to participate in the study. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Roy Adaptation Model was used as a conceptual framework. Severity of side effects, self-esteem, social support, and role adaptation were the variables of this study. Methods: Demographic and Clinical Data Form, Severity of Side Effects Questionnaire, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, Personal Resource Questionnaire 85-part II, and Role Adaptation Questionnaire were used as a tool to collect data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis. Findings: The results showed that cervical cancer patients receiving radiation had levels of “rather good role adaptation”. The combination of social support, self-esteem, and severity of side effects accounted for 54.8% of the variance in role adaptation of cervical cancer patients receiving radiation except educational level. Implications: The results of this study are important for nurses to concern with the management of side effects, social resources, and self-esteem that are significant factors in enhancing role adaptation of the patients with cervical cancer receiving radiation therapy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSeverity of side effects, self-esteem, social support, and role adaptation of cervical cancer patients receiving radiation therapyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154711-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Severity of side effects, self-esteem, social support, and role adaptation of cervical cancer patients receiving radiation therapy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kitrungrote, Luppana</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Prince of Songkhla University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kluppana@ratree.psu.ac.th</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This study is aimed to describe role adaptation and to ascertain predictive power of severity of side effects, self-esteem, social support, and education on role adaptation of patients with cervical cancer receiving radiation. Design: A descriptive design was used. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The sample was comprised of 86 women recruited from the outpatient radiotherapy unit at six hospitals in Bangkok, Thailand, during February to June 2000. Women with cervical cancer who have the following criteria were included (1) were married and lived with their spouses, (2) had been receiving radiation (3,000cGy) at least for a 3-week period, (3) had no prior treatment with radiation or chemotherapy, (4) were able to understand and speak Thai, and (5) agreed to participate in the study. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Roy Adaptation Model was used as a conceptual framework. Severity of side effects, self-esteem, social support, and role adaptation were the variables of this study. Methods: Demographic and Clinical Data Form, Severity of Side Effects Questionnaire, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, Personal Resource Questionnaire 85-part II, and Role Adaptation Questionnaire were used as a tool to collect data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis. Findings: The results showed that cervical cancer patients receiving radiation had levels of &ldquo;rather good role adaptation&rdquo;. The combination of social support, self-esteem, and severity of side effects accounted for 54.8% of the variance in role adaptation of cervical cancer patients receiving radiation except educational level. Implications: The results of this study are important for nurses to concern with the management of side effects, social resources, and self-esteem that are significant factors in enhancing role adaptation of the patients with cervical cancer receiving radiation therapy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:13:01Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:13:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.