The Lived Experiences of Graduate Nursing Students Enrolled in an Online Advanced Pathophysiology Course

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154713
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Lived Experiences of Graduate Nursing Students Enrolled in an Online Advanced Pathophysiology Course
Abstract:
The Lived Experiences of Graduate Nursing Students Enrolled in an Online Advanced Pathophysiology Course
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Proksch, Mary
P.I. Institution Name:Winona State University
Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of the students who chose to take an online section of a graduate level advanced pathophysiology course. In other words, to try and answer the question, “What is happening here?” as far as their beliefs, feelings and explanations of their experience with taking this online course. Design: Descriptive phenomenological investigation of the perceptions and experiences of graduate students enrolled in an online advanced pathophysiology course. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A convenience sample of eight graduate students who chose to enroll in the online section of an advanced pathophysiology course as part of their Master's in Nursing program requirement was used in this study. The setting for the study was a state university located in the upper Midwest. The study was conducted in 2000-2001. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The concepts of interest in this study are expressed in the words students used to describe their experiences. Thus, in this research approach the investigator did not identify concepts a priori. Methods: Sixty to ninety minute semi-structured taped interviews were scheduled with each student. A follow-up interview was scheduled with each student to verify content, clarify points and to elicit any further thoughts the student may have had regarding the course following the initial interview. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed for patterns, clusters and general themes. Findings: Preliminary findings show the importance of learning style, motivation and self-directedness in the overall satisfaction with the course. The study also looked at the student-student and teacher-student relationships and found differences in the importance students attached to face-to-face encounters both with their peers and the faculty. Conclusions: It is the stories of these students and other students enrolled in similar online courses that will guide faculties, deans, and department chairs in strengthening and expanding the nursing curricula to meet the students’ diverse learning needs. Implications: The issue of the lived experience of students enrolled in online courses remains extremely relevant as an increasing number of colleges and universities turn to offering online courses on the Internet to expand their market share and to better meet the needs of their students. There are limited qualitative studies exploring the issue of the students' experiences as they progress through an online course; that is, how does such an experience affect their beliefs, self-confidence, self-identity, their core self? Patterns, clusters, and general themes from these students' stories can inform nurse educators on effective use of technology in education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Lived Experiences of Graduate Nursing Students Enrolled in an Online Advanced Pathophysiology Courseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154713-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Lived Experiences of Graduate Nursing Students Enrolled in an Online Advanced Pathophysiology Course</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Proksch, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mproksch@winona.msus.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of the students who chose to take an online section of a graduate level advanced pathophysiology course. In other words, to try and answer the question, &ldquo;What is happening here?&rdquo; as far as their beliefs, feelings and explanations of their experience with taking this online course. Design: Descriptive phenomenological investigation of the perceptions and experiences of graduate students enrolled in an online advanced pathophysiology course. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A convenience sample of eight graduate students who chose to enroll in the online section of an advanced pathophysiology course as part of their Master's in Nursing program requirement was used in this study. The setting for the study was a state university located in the upper Midwest. The study was conducted in 2000-2001. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The concepts of interest in this study are expressed in the words students used to describe their experiences. Thus, in this research approach the investigator did not identify concepts a priori. Methods: Sixty to ninety minute semi-structured taped interviews were scheduled with each student. A follow-up interview was scheduled with each student to verify content, clarify points and to elicit any further thoughts the student may have had regarding the course following the initial interview. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed for patterns, clusters and general themes. Findings: Preliminary findings show the importance of learning style, motivation and self-directedness in the overall satisfaction with the course. The study also looked at the student-student and teacher-student relationships and found differences in the importance students attached to face-to-face encounters both with their peers and the faculty. Conclusions: It is the stories of these students and other students enrolled in similar online courses that will guide faculties, deans, and department chairs in strengthening and expanding the nursing curricula to meet the students&rsquo; diverse learning needs. Implications: The issue of the lived experience of students enrolled in online courses remains extremely relevant as an increasing number of colleges and universities turn to offering online courses on the Internet to expand their market share and to better meet the needs of their students. There are limited qualitative studies exploring the issue of the students' experiences as they progress through an online course; that is, how does such an experience affect their beliefs, self-confidence, self-identity, their core self? Patterns, clusters, and general themes from these students' stories can inform nurse educators on effective use of technology in education. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:13:06Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:13:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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