Till Death Do Us Part – The Meaning of Placing a Spouse in a Nursing Home Experienced by Wives

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154717
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Till Death Do Us Part – The Meaning of Placing a Spouse in a Nursing Home Experienced by Wives
Abstract:
Till Death Do Us Part – The Meaning of Placing a Spouse in a Nursing Home Experienced by Wives
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Lindhardt, Tove
P.I. Institution Name:Copenhagen County University Hospital in Gentofte
Objective: To bring forward the meaning of placing one’s husband in a nursing home as experienced by the wives. Design: Descriptive, qualitative. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Older women who have had to place their husband in a nursing home. Sample: 8 women were interviewed. Half of them living in Copenhagen and the other half in the rural part of Zealand (Sjælland). Year: 1994. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Transition, roles and relations, grief, and stress. Methods: Giorgi’s phenomenological method was used for data collection as well as the data analysis. Six older women, who had to place their husbands in nursing homes, were interviewed in depth in order to bring forward the essences of the meaning of this experience. Findings and conclusions: The respondent’s experiences appeared in four essences: “The last thing I can do for him” – about the loyalty and sense of duty. “The conditional freedom” – about the new life. “The doubt is still there” – about the doubt, guilt feeling and conscience. “I always get a cup of coffee” – about the wives’ needs. The wives were still feeling and acting upon the caregiver responsibility, even though the husband was now under professional care. The identification was strong – his pain was their pain. Because of the commitment and the stress burden the freedom was conditional, oppressed with guilt and grief. The transitional and mourning process was impeded by the stress burden and the caregiving activities towards the husband, as well as by the fatigue and the guilt feeling. The mourning process differs thereby from the process the loss of the husband by death would have initiated. They became ”married widows”. Neither the staff nor the family acted upon these women’s needs and apparently the professionals did not consider them focus for the nursing function. They were therefore left alone to deal with their burden and their grief. Implications: The foremost important intervention for nursing is a change in attitude in the nursing home staff. The spouses of the inhabitants are not merely visitors but the inhabitant’s most significant support and life witnesses. They are a resource in the nursing care planning and should as such be involved in it. It would increase the quality of the care as well as minimise the feeling of powerlessness and stress in these wives to give them influence on the husband’s care. Another change concerns the need to view them as a focus for nursing intervention. A large preventive task lies in helping these women in their transitional and mourning process. By using the theories about transition and coping nurses will have an excellent tool for data assessment, and the intervention will aim at finding that balance between proximity and distance to the husband the wife needs. One of the ways to achieve this is to help her separate the husband’s needs from her own. This will demand therapeutic skills from the nurses. The question is whether nurses of to day have those skills as well as the emotional courage to use them.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTill Death Do Us Part – The Meaning of Placing a Spouse in a Nursing Home Experienced by Wivesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154717-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Till Death Do Us Part &ndash; The Meaning of Placing a Spouse in a Nursing Home Experienced by Wives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lindhardt, Tove</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Copenhagen County University Hospital in Gentofte</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">toil@gentoftehosp.kbhamt.dk</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To bring forward the meaning of placing one&rsquo;s husband in a nursing home as experienced by the wives. Design: Descriptive, qualitative. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Older women who have had to place their husband in a nursing home. Sample: 8 women were interviewed. Half of them living in Copenhagen and the other half in the rural part of Zealand (Sj&aelig;lland). Year: 1994. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Transition, roles and relations, grief, and stress. Methods: Giorgi&rsquo;s phenomenological method was used for data collection as well as the data analysis. Six older women, who had to place their husbands in nursing homes, were interviewed in depth in order to bring forward the essences of the meaning of this experience. Findings and conclusions: The respondent&rsquo;s experiences appeared in four essences: &ldquo;The last thing I can do for him&rdquo; &ndash; about the loyalty and sense of duty. &ldquo;The conditional freedom&rdquo; &ndash; about the new life. &ldquo;The doubt is still there&rdquo; &ndash; about the doubt, guilt feeling and conscience. &ldquo;I always get a cup of coffee&rdquo; &ndash; about the wives&rsquo; needs. The wives were still feeling and acting upon the caregiver responsibility, even though the husband was now under professional care. The identification was strong &ndash; his pain was their pain. Because of the commitment and the stress burden the freedom was conditional, oppressed with guilt and grief. The transitional and mourning process was impeded by the stress burden and the caregiving activities towards the husband, as well as by the fatigue and the guilt feeling. The mourning process differs thereby from the process the loss of the husband by death would have initiated. They became &rdquo;married widows&rdquo;. Neither the staff nor the family acted upon these women&rsquo;s needs and apparently the professionals did not consider them focus for the nursing function. They were therefore left alone to deal with their burden and their grief. Implications: The foremost important intervention for nursing is a change in attitude in the nursing home staff. The spouses of the inhabitants are not merely visitors but the inhabitant&rsquo;s most significant support and life witnesses. They are a resource in the nursing care planning and should as such be involved in it. It would increase the quality of the care as well as minimise the feeling of powerlessness and stress in these wives to give them influence on the husband&rsquo;s care. Another change concerns the need to view them as a focus for nursing intervention. A large preventive task lies in helping these women in their transitional and mourning process. By using the theories about transition and coping nurses will have an excellent tool for data assessment, and the intervention will aim at finding that balance between proximity and distance to the husband the wife needs. One of the ways to achieve this is to help her separate the husband&rsquo;s needs from her own. This will demand therapeutic skills from the nurses. The question is whether nurses of to day have those skills as well as the emotional courage to use them.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:13:17Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:13:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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