2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154723
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bone Mineral Density of Premenopausal Women with Persistent Asthma
Abstract:
Bone Mineral Density of Premenopausal Women with Persistent Asthma
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Pogue, Nancy
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois
Objectives: 1) To compare the bone mineral density (BMD) of premenopausal asthmatic women treated with inhaled corticosteroids to same age, healthy women and to norms for young women at peak bone mass; 2) to explore factors that affect the bone density of premenopausal women with persistent asthma. Design: Cross-sectional, exploratory study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: From a population of 30 to 40 year-old, eumenorrhic, Caucasian women, volunteers were 21 asthmatic (36.5 ± 3.7 years old) and 20 healthy women (36.3 ± 3.2 years old) who had no other diseases that interfered with bone maintenance. Asthmatic women had used inhaled corticosteroids for a minimum of 6 months and had no systemic corticosteroids for at least 3 months. The study setting was a Midwestern university community and the surrounding rural area. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The independent variable was persistent asthma; the dependent variable was bone mineral density of the total body, spine, and hip; covariates were corticosteroid dose, usual calcium intake, and physical activity in the past year. Methods: Methods included: 1) Questionnaires for health history, usual calcium intake and physical activity; and 2) Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry for measurement of BMD. Findings: Asthmatic and healthy women were not significantly different in age, height, weight, mineral-free lean body mass (m-f LBM), usual calcium intake or physical activity. Asthmatic women had a significantly lower BMD than healthy women for the total body, lumbar spine and greater trochanter. Using W.H.O. standards, 48% of asthmatics were classified as osteopenic at one or more sites compared to 16% of healthy women. There were wide variations in BMD among asthmatic women. Cumulative 1 yr. inhaled corticosteroid dose did not correlate with asthmatics’ BMD at any site. The m-f LBM was most strongly correlated with BMD for both groups. Usual calcium intake was weakly correlated with BMD at all sites and physical activity was weakly (total body & spine) to moderately (gr. trochanter) correlated with BMD in asthmatic women, but correlations were not significant. Usual calcium intake was weakly correlated (spine & femoral neck) to BMD and physical activity was moderately and significantly correlated with the greater trochanter BMD in healthy women. Conclusions: Premenopausal women with persistent asthma are at increased risk for lower BMD compared to healthy, same age women and normative values for healthy young women at peak BMD. Implications: Further study is required to determine whether increased levels of physical activity and usual calcium intake have a protective effect on the BMD of women with persistent asthma.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBone Mineral Density of Premenopausal Women with Persistent Asthmaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154723-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Bone Mineral Density of Premenopausal Women with Persistent Asthma</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pogue, Nancy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">n-pogue@uiuc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: 1) To compare the bone mineral density (BMD) of premenopausal asthmatic women treated with inhaled corticosteroids to same age, healthy women and to norms for young women at peak bone mass; 2) to explore factors that affect the bone density of premenopausal women with persistent asthma. Design: Cross-sectional, exploratory study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: From a population of 30 to 40 year-old, eumenorrhic, Caucasian women, volunteers were 21 asthmatic (36.5 &plusmn; 3.7 years old) and 20 healthy women (36.3 &plusmn; 3.2 years old) who had no other diseases that interfered with bone maintenance. Asthmatic women had used inhaled corticosteroids for a minimum of 6 months and had no systemic corticosteroids for at least 3 months. The study setting was a Midwestern university community and the surrounding rural area. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The independent variable was persistent asthma; the dependent variable was bone mineral density of the total body, spine, and hip; covariates were corticosteroid dose, usual calcium intake, and physical activity in the past year. Methods: Methods included: 1) Questionnaires for health history, usual calcium intake and physical activity; and 2) Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry for measurement of BMD. Findings: Asthmatic and healthy women were not significantly different in age, height, weight, mineral-free lean body mass (m-f LBM), usual calcium intake or physical activity. Asthmatic women had a significantly lower BMD than healthy women for the total body, lumbar spine and greater trochanter. Using W.H.O. standards, 48% of asthmatics were classified as osteopenic at one or more sites compared to 16% of healthy women. There were wide variations in BMD among asthmatic women. Cumulative 1 yr. inhaled corticosteroid dose did not correlate with asthmatics&rsquo; BMD at any site. The m-f LBM was most strongly correlated with BMD for both groups. Usual calcium intake was weakly correlated with BMD at all sites and physical activity was weakly (total body &amp; spine) to moderately (gr. trochanter) correlated with BMD in asthmatic women, but correlations were not significant. Usual calcium intake was weakly correlated (spine &amp; femoral neck) to BMD and physical activity was moderately and significantly correlated with the greater trochanter BMD in healthy women. Conclusions: Premenopausal women with persistent asthma are at increased risk for lower BMD compared to healthy, same age women and normative values for healthy young women at peak BMD. Implications: Further study is required to determine whether increased levels of physical activity and usual calcium intake have a protective effect on the BMD of women with persistent asthma.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:13:35Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:13:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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