2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154724
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HIV/AIDS Family Caregiving in the Context of Silence
Abstract:
HIV/AIDS Family Caregiving in the Context of Silence
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Spirig, Rebecca
P.I. Institution Name:University of Basel
Objectives: HIV/AIDS affected families and their experiences providing care to their HIV/AIDS infected family members have been invisible in the nursing literature in Switzerland so far. The purpose of the current study was to present beginning insights in how caregiving is experienced by HIV/AIDS affected families in the given context of the Swiss society. Since critical hermeneutics was employed, the research critically explored how experiences, attitudes, and concerns are shaped by larger socio-cultural influences. Consequently, family caregiving in the context of HIV/AIDS became a highly multifaceted picture. Design: Qualitative descriptive design. Employing critical hermeneutics methodologies. Population: Eleven families participated. They consisted of 12 women and 5 men living in diverse settings in urban and rural areas of the Swiss German part of Switzerland. They can be portrayed as being of two family generations because of the involved mothers and fathers representing one and partners, brothers, sisters, and a son representing another generation. The age of the participants ranged from 31 to 70 years with a mean age of 47.4. All of the participants were HIV negative. Method: Fifteen in depth interviews were conducted, 8 interviews with entire families and 7 with single family members. Family members of different families have been asked to participate in group conversations to discuss analysis products. Three group interviews were conducted. The analysis followed hermeneutic analysis procedures. Results: Two main themes developed that summarize the experiences of the participating families: 1) Caught in between: Family caregivers living in between traditional family ideals and family changes forced by HIV/AIDS and 2) no request for support: family caregiving in the context of invisibility and individuality. Hermeneutic reflection on these two themes highlighted the context where the families’ provide caregiving, which is called HIV/AIDS family caregiving in the context of silence. The context of silence can be seen as a creative answer to an oppressive environment. The families create silent circles in which they feel accepted and protected and which seemed to be essential for the well being of these families. These silent circles, however are also a representation of social marginalization and cultural imperialism. Family caregiving in the context of silence is very much influenced by social structures. A closer look at the social environment of the Swiss HIV/AIDS family caregivers shows that the Swiss health care system does focus on the individual person and not on the family as the unit of care. There are no family policies regarding family care of adult family members and the Swiss health care system does not offer systematic health services tailored to these families. Additionally, along with other health care providers in Switzerland, nurses do “not think family”, which reinforces the silence surrounding the HIV/AIDS family caregivers. Conclusions: The families’ perceptions were shaped by family discourses and the construction of HIV/AIDS in Switzerland. Additionally, the social and cultural context such as the foci of the health care system in general and nursing that do “not think family” influence HIV/AIDS family care enormously. In this context, the HIV/AIDS affected families’ creation of silent circles can be seen as a creative answer to a highly diverse and painful situation. Implications: Knowledge generated by this research increases the understanding about HIV/AIDS family caregiving in Switzerland. This knowledge is helpful in the creation of family services specifically tailored to HIV/AIDS affected families. It also is helpful in the identification of strategies that teach nurses the complexities of family caregiving so that they may start to “think family”.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHIV/AIDS Family Caregiving in the Context of Silenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154724-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">HIV/AIDS Family Caregiving in the Context of Silence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Spirig, Rebecca</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Basel</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rebecca.spirig@unibas.ch</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: HIV/AIDS affected families and their experiences providing care to their HIV/AIDS infected family members have been invisible in the nursing literature in Switzerland so far. The purpose of the current study was to present beginning insights in how caregiving is experienced by HIV/AIDS affected families in the given context of the Swiss society. Since critical hermeneutics was employed, the research critically explored how experiences, attitudes, and concerns are shaped by larger socio-cultural influences. Consequently, family caregiving in the context of HIV/AIDS became a highly multifaceted picture. Design: Qualitative descriptive design. Employing critical hermeneutics methodologies. Population: Eleven families participated. They consisted of 12 women and 5 men living in diverse settings in urban and rural areas of the Swiss German part of Switzerland. They can be portrayed as being of two family generations because of the involved mothers and fathers representing one and partners, brothers, sisters, and a son representing another generation. The age of the participants ranged from 31 to 70 years with a mean age of 47.4. All of the participants were HIV negative. Method: Fifteen in depth interviews were conducted, 8 interviews with entire families and 7 with single family members. Family members of different families have been asked to participate in group conversations to discuss analysis products. Three group interviews were conducted. The analysis followed hermeneutic analysis procedures. Results: Two main themes developed that summarize the experiences of the participating families: 1) Caught in between: Family caregivers living in between traditional family ideals and family changes forced by HIV/AIDS and 2) no request for support: family caregiving in the context of invisibility and individuality. Hermeneutic reflection on these two themes highlighted the context where the families&rsquo; provide caregiving, which is called HIV/AIDS family caregiving in the context of silence. The context of silence can be seen as a creative answer to an oppressive environment. The families create silent circles in which they feel accepted and protected and which seemed to be essential for the well being of these families. These silent circles, however are also a representation of social marginalization and cultural imperialism. Family caregiving in the context of silence is very much influenced by social structures. A closer look at the social environment of the Swiss HIV/AIDS family caregivers shows that the Swiss health care system does focus on the individual person and not on the family as the unit of care. There are no family policies regarding family care of adult family members and the Swiss health care system does not offer systematic health services tailored to these families. Additionally, along with other health care providers in Switzerland, nurses do &ldquo;not think family&rdquo;, which reinforces the silence surrounding the HIV/AIDS family caregivers. Conclusions: The families&rsquo; perceptions were shaped by family discourses and the construction of HIV/AIDS in Switzerland. Additionally, the social and cultural context such as the foci of the health care system in general and nursing that do &ldquo;not think family&rdquo; influence HIV/AIDS family care enormously. In this context, the HIV/AIDS affected families&rsquo; creation of silent circles can be seen as a creative answer to a highly diverse and painful situation. Implications: Knowledge generated by this research increases the understanding about HIV/AIDS family caregiving in Switzerland. This knowledge is helpful in the creation of family services specifically tailored to HIV/AIDS affected families. It also is helpful in the identification of strategies that teach nurses the complexities of family caregiving so that they may start to &ldquo;think family&rdquo;.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:13:38Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:13:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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