2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154729
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal Correlates of Depression During Pregnancy with Preterm Labor
Abstract:
Maternal Correlates of Depression During Pregnancy with Preterm Labor
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Feinstein, Nancy
P.I. Institution Name:University of Rochester
Title:Senior Research Associate
Objective: Women with preterm labor (PTL) experience anxiety, mood changes, and depression during pregnancy. This has implications for the pregnancy experience and may impact on emotions and functioning after pregnancy. Despite the fact that 20% of women experience PTL and its associated negative impact, there is a paucity of theoretically-driven intervention studies designed to promote maternal coping during this type of pregnancy. The objective of this secondary data analysis was to examine maternal correlates of depression during pregnancy with PTL. This analysis was conducted as part of a larger intervention study that demonstrated the positive effects of an informational behavioral program (MOST: Monitoring of Self Through Transition)on coping outcomes of 99 women with PTL. The intervention findings included less depression and negative mood state, stronger maternal beliefs about handling the PTL experience during pregnancy, and more skillful problem solving regarding the care of the infant 3-4 weeks post infant discharge. Design: Descriptive correlational secondary data analysis. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The primary study included 99 women with PTL, between 18 and 30 weeks gestation on enrollment. The women were from 2 regional perinatal centers in 2000. Variables Studied Together: Maternal depression during the pregnancy, maternal anxiety, pregnancy anxiety, maternal beliefs, demographic, and clinical variables. Methods: Correlational analysis. Findings: Findings revealed significant correlations between the MOST program, the mother's trait, state, and pregnancy anxiety, maternal beliefs about their ability to manage the PTL experience. Specifically, (a) mothers who received the MOST program experienced less depression within 1 to 2 weeks post-intervention, (b) mothers with stronger beliefs about what to expect and how to manage PTL had less depression, and (c) mothers with higher anxiety, pregnancy anxiety and negative mood state (including confusion, hostility, fatigue, and uncertainty) experienced higher levels of depression. Conclusions: Findings support the need for early assessment of these variables during a pregnancy complicated with preterm labor, as well as the need for interventions to decrease maternal depression. Implications: Early recognition of and intervention for maternal depression during pregnancy can impact on maternal outcomes during and after pregnancy, which also may potentially impact on maternal parenting and infant outcomes.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal Correlates of Depression During Pregnancy with Preterm Laboren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154729-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal Correlates of Depression During Pregnancy with Preterm Labor</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Feinstein, Nancy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Rochester</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Research Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nancy_feinstein@urmc.rochester</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Women with preterm labor (PTL) experience anxiety, mood changes, and depression during pregnancy. This has implications for the pregnancy experience and may impact on emotions and functioning after pregnancy. Despite the fact that 20% of women experience PTL and its associated negative impact, there is a paucity of theoretically-driven intervention studies designed to promote maternal coping during this type of pregnancy. The objective of this secondary data analysis was to examine maternal correlates of depression during pregnancy with PTL. This analysis was conducted as part of a larger intervention study that demonstrated the positive effects of an informational behavioral program (MOST: Monitoring of Self Through Transition)on coping outcomes of 99 women with PTL. The intervention findings included less depression and negative mood state, stronger maternal beliefs about handling the PTL experience during pregnancy, and more skillful problem solving regarding the care of the infant 3-4 weeks post infant discharge. Design: Descriptive correlational secondary data analysis. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The primary study included 99 women with PTL, between 18 and 30 weeks gestation on enrollment. The women were from 2 regional perinatal centers in 2000. Variables Studied Together: Maternal depression during the pregnancy, maternal anxiety, pregnancy anxiety, maternal beliefs, demographic, and clinical variables. Methods: Correlational analysis. Findings: Findings revealed significant correlations between the MOST program, the mother's trait, state, and pregnancy anxiety, maternal beliefs about their ability to manage the PTL experience. Specifically, (a) mothers who received the MOST program experienced less depression within 1 to 2 weeks post-intervention, (b) mothers with stronger beliefs about what to expect and how to manage PTL had less depression, and (c) mothers with higher anxiety, pregnancy anxiety and negative mood state (including confusion, hostility, fatigue, and uncertainty) experienced higher levels of depression. Conclusions: Findings support the need for early assessment of these variables during a pregnancy complicated with preterm labor, as well as the need for interventions to decrease maternal depression. Implications: Early recognition of and intervention for maternal depression during pregnancy can impact on maternal outcomes during and after pregnancy, which also may potentially impact on maternal parenting and infant outcomes.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:13:52Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:13:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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