Relationship between Cervical Dysplasia and Sexual or Physical Abuse among Minority Women with Sexually Transmitted Diseases

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154731
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship between Cervical Dysplasia and Sexual or Physical Abuse among Minority Women with Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Abstract:
Relationship between Cervical Dysplasia and Sexual or Physical Abuse among Minority Women with Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Champion, Jane
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: Describe the relationship between sexual or physical abuse, sexual risk and health seeking behaviors, contraception and cervical dysplasia among minority women with sexually transmitted diseases (STD). Design: Controlled, randomized trial of behavioral intervention for prevention of STD among high-risk minority women with STD. Population, Sample, Setting: Mexican-and African-American women aged 14-45 years who have a current STD including Gonorrhea, Chlamydia, Trichomonas or Syphilis. Variables: Sexual risk behaviors, contraception, health seeking behaviors, cervical dysplasia, sexual or physical abuse. Methods: Participants (n=827) upon study entry underwent questioning regarding sexual or physical abuse, sexual risk behaviors, contraception, health seeking behaviors and cervical dysplasia. Findings: Comparisons indicated sexually or physically abused women (n=531) had earlier coitus (p=.003), more sex partners at 1, 3, 6, 12 month and lifetime intervals (p<.001), a higher previous incidence of STD (p<.05) and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) (p<.001) than nonabused women. Although more abused women reported ever use of hormonal contraception (birth control pills, depoprovera, norplant) (p<.001), more nonabused women reported current use of contraception (p<.01); no differences were found in condom use. Although more abused than nonabused women reported a history of cervical dysplasia (p<.005), fewer abused women reported having a pap smear in the past 12 months (p<.001). Abused women reported experiencing more barriers to health care services (p<.01) including transportation, financial, and embarrassment (shame) than non-abused. Conclusions: Among minority women with STD, abused women's reports of relatively higher sexual risk behaviors, previous STD and PID history, greater use of contraception and limited use of condoms identify them as women at even higher risk for cervical dysplasia than nonabused women with STD. Sexual or physical abuse has a considerable impact on health-seeking behaviors that further increases risk for cervical dysplasia and decreases likelihood of its appropriate clinical management. Therefore, assessment for sexual or physical abuse is essential in clinical management of cervical dysplasia for women with STD. Implications: Sexually or physically abused women with STD are at high-risk for cervical dysplasia and experience more health care barriers than nonabused women with STD due to embarrassment and financial or transportation concerns. An assessment for sexual or physical abuse is necessary for appropriate clinical management of STDs among women.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship between Cervical Dysplasia and Sexual or Physical Abuse among Minority Women with Sexually Transmitted Diseasesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154731-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship between Cervical Dysplasia and Sexual or Physical Abuse among Minority Women with Sexually Transmitted Diseases</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Champion, Jane</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dimmitt@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Describe the relationship between sexual or physical abuse, sexual risk and health seeking behaviors, contraception and cervical dysplasia among minority women with sexually transmitted diseases (STD). Design: Controlled, randomized trial of behavioral intervention for prevention of STD among high-risk minority women with STD. Population, Sample, Setting: Mexican-and African-American women aged 14-45 years who have a current STD including Gonorrhea, Chlamydia, Trichomonas or Syphilis. Variables: Sexual risk behaviors, contraception, health seeking behaviors, cervical dysplasia, sexual or physical abuse. Methods: Participants (n=827) upon study entry underwent questioning regarding sexual or physical abuse, sexual risk behaviors, contraception, health seeking behaviors and cervical dysplasia. Findings: Comparisons indicated sexually or physically abused women (n=531) had earlier coitus (p=.003), more sex partners at 1, 3, 6, 12 month and lifetime intervals (p&lt;.001), a higher previous incidence of STD (p&lt;.05) and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) (p&lt;.001) than nonabused women. Although more abused women reported ever use of hormonal contraception (birth control pills, depoprovera, norplant) (p&lt;.001), more nonabused women reported current use of contraception (p&lt;.01); no differences were found in condom use. Although more abused than nonabused women reported a history of cervical dysplasia (p&lt;.005), fewer abused women reported having a pap smear in the past 12 months (p&lt;.001). Abused women reported experiencing more barriers to health care services (p&lt;.01) including transportation, financial, and embarrassment (shame) than non-abused. Conclusions: Among minority women with STD, abused women's reports of relatively higher sexual risk behaviors, previous STD and PID history, greater use of contraception and limited use of condoms identify them as women at even higher risk for cervical dysplasia than nonabused women with STD. Sexual or physical abuse has a considerable impact on health-seeking behaviors that further increases risk for cervical dysplasia and decreases likelihood of its appropriate clinical management. Therefore, assessment for sexual or physical abuse is essential in clinical management of cervical dysplasia for women with STD. Implications: Sexually or physically abused women with STD are at high-risk for cervical dysplasia and experience more health care barriers than nonabused women with STD due to embarrassment and financial or transportation concerns. An assessment for sexual or physical abuse is necessary for appropriate clinical management of STDs among women.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:13:57Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:13:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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