Effects of Job Strain, Organizational Factors and Individual Characteristics on Nurses' Work-Related Disabilities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154735
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Job Strain, Organizational Factors and Individual Characteristics on Nurses' Work-Related Disabilities
Abstract:
Effects of Job Strain, Organizational Factors and Individual Characteristics on Nurses' Work-Related Disabilities
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Shamian, Judith, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toronto
Title:Executive Director, Nursing Policy
Objective: This study examines the impact of job strain on the health of nurses by 1)describing nurses' health status, 2) examining trends in injury claims, 3) determining factors that contribute to claims, and 4) asking nurses to identify interventions to improve their workplace health and safety and gathering input from nurses and hospital stakeholders on nurse injuries, stress and absenteeism. Design: Both cross sectional correlational and longitudinal trend analysis designs were used to examine the first 3 questions in this study. A qualitative focus group design was used to examine nurses 'and managers' perceptions of factors influencing workplace safety and interventions to improve workplace safety. Sample: The sample consisted of 7934 nurse surveys', utilization statistics from all 135 Ontario hospital from 1998, and claims data for nurses and other workers in Ontario from 1990-1998. Variables Studied: Nurses' health and job strain (work environments with high job demands and low control over work processes) were examined relative to nurse injury insurance claim rates for 1998. Methods: This study included both quantitative and qualitative components. Data from three 1998/9 Ontario data sources were merged: a survey completed by nurses who participated in the Ontario, Canada leg of the Aiken (1998) international study about their work life, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care hospital annual utilization and cost submissions and Workers' Safety Insurance Board lost-time claim rates from 1990-1998. After data merger the trends analysis for claims rates was completed, correlational analysis was used to determine the relationships among individual and organizational factors between high and low claims rate hospitals. Logistic regression analysis was completed to determine which factors were significant predictors in high and low hospital overall claims rates and musculoskletal claims rates. Stakeholders (CEOs, nursing administrators, occupational health and safety personnel) and nurses from 10 hospitals ( five high claims hospitals and five low claims hospitals) participated in focus groups and interviews. Qualitative analysis provided insight into both the factors influencing injuries, stress and absenteeism rates and potential interventions to reduce claims rates. Results: Nurses have higher claim rates compared to non-nurses, and mucsculoskeletal claims comprise the majority of nursing claims. High claims rate hospitals reported significantly fewer opportunities for autonomous practice compared to low claims rates hospitals. Overtime, occasions of sick time and nurse relations with physicians significantly predicted high and low nursing claim rates. For every quartile increase in overtime hours of greater than 1 hour per week (examined in quartiles) the odds of a any type of claims rate increased by 1.7. Every unit increase of improved nurse/physician relations was associated with a 1.64 decrease in muslculoskeletal injury rates. The number of occurrences of sicktime in the last three months was negatively associated with both types of claims rates. This study demonstrates that environment in which nurses work significantly influences their health and the number of worker safety insurance claims posted. Nurses and members of the management team gave different priority ratings to factors to influencing nurses' health. Nurses believe that adequate staffing levels and reasonable workload would improve their health. Conclusions: Injuries among nurses are costly to both hospitals in terms of lost productivity, disruption to work flow and claims paid, as well as to nurses in terms of pain, stress and possible loss of employment. If substantive change is to be made in the work environment then perceptual difference about the etiology of injuries, sick time and stress between managers and nurses staff must be addressed. Implications: This study provides insight into the nature of nurse injuries, their prevalence and factors in the work environment that can be changed to reduce overall insurance claims and create a healthy work environment. Serious attention needs to be paid to the work environment if we are to retain our current workforce and attract a future workforce.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Job Strain, Organizational Factors and Individual Characteristics on Nurses' Work-Related Disabilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154735-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Job Strain, Organizational Factors and Individual Characteristics on Nurses' Work-Related Disabilities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shamian, Judith, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toronto</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Executive Director, Nursing Policy</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">j.shamian@utoronto.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This study examines the impact of job strain on the health of nurses by 1)describing nurses' health status, 2) examining trends in injury claims, 3) determining factors that contribute to claims, and 4) asking nurses to identify interventions to improve their workplace health and safety and gathering input from nurses and hospital stakeholders on nurse injuries, stress and absenteeism. Design: Both cross sectional correlational and longitudinal trend analysis designs were used to examine the first 3 questions in this study. A qualitative focus group design was used to examine nurses 'and managers' perceptions of factors influencing workplace safety and interventions to improve workplace safety. Sample: The sample consisted of 7934 nurse surveys', utilization statistics from all 135 Ontario hospital from 1998, and claims data for nurses and other workers in Ontario from 1990-1998. Variables Studied: Nurses' health and job strain (work environments with high job demands and low control over work processes) were examined relative to nurse injury insurance claim rates for 1998. Methods: This study included both quantitative and qualitative components. Data from three 1998/9 Ontario data sources were merged: a survey completed by nurses who participated in the Ontario, Canada leg of the Aiken (1998) international study about their work life, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care hospital annual utilization and cost submissions and Workers' Safety Insurance Board lost-time claim rates from 1990-1998. After data merger the trends analysis for claims rates was completed, correlational analysis was used to determine the relationships among individual and organizational factors between high and low claims rate hospitals. Logistic regression analysis was completed to determine which factors were significant predictors in high and low hospital overall claims rates and musculoskletal claims rates. Stakeholders (CEOs, nursing administrators, occupational health and safety personnel) and nurses from 10 hospitals ( five high claims hospitals and five low claims hospitals) participated in focus groups and interviews. Qualitative analysis provided insight into both the factors influencing injuries, stress and absenteeism rates and potential interventions to reduce claims rates. Results: Nurses have higher claim rates compared to non-nurses, and mucsculoskeletal claims comprise the majority of nursing claims. High claims rate hospitals reported significantly fewer opportunities for autonomous practice compared to low claims rates hospitals. Overtime, occasions of sick time and nurse relations with physicians significantly predicted high and low nursing claim rates. For every quartile increase in overtime hours of greater than 1 hour per week (examined in quartiles) the odds of a any type of claims rate increased by 1.7. Every unit increase of improved nurse/physician relations was associated with a 1.64 decrease in muslculoskeletal injury rates. The number of occurrences of sicktime in the last three months was negatively associated with both types of claims rates. This study demonstrates that environment in which nurses work significantly influences their health and the number of worker safety insurance claims posted. Nurses and members of the management team gave different priority ratings to factors to influencing nurses' health. Nurses believe that adequate staffing levels and reasonable workload would improve their health. Conclusions: Injuries among nurses are costly to both hospitals in terms of lost productivity, disruption to work flow and claims paid, as well as to nurses in terms of pain, stress and possible loss of employment. If substantive change is to be made in the work environment then perceptual difference about the etiology of injuries, sick time and stress between managers and nurses staff must be addressed. Implications: This study provides insight into the nature of nurse injuries, their prevalence and factors in the work environment that can be changed to reduce overall insurance claims and create a healthy work environment. Serious attention needs to be paid to the work environment if we are to retain our current workforce and attract a future workforce.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:14:10Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:14:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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