Factors Associated with Subglottic Secretion Accumulation and Removal among Mechanically Ventilated Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154738
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Associated with Subglottic Secretion Accumulation and Removal among Mechanically Ventilated Adults
Abstract:
Factors Associated with Subglottic Secretion Accumulation and Removal among Mechanically Ventilated Adults
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:O'Neal, Pamela
P.I. Institution Name:Gordon College
Title:Division Chair and Assistant Professor
Objectives: To describe the relationship between subglottic secretion (SS) volume and patient volume status (PVS) and to describe the relationship between SS viscosity and PVS. Design: A descriptive design was used since these is pioneering research. Concepts Studied: Potentially pathogenic SSs pool above and leak around the folds of the endotracheal tube cuff during intubation and predispose the patient to ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Identifying factors associated with SS accumulation and removal may delay and prevent VAP occurrence. Over 90% of mechanically ventilated patients acquire nosocomial pneumonia, VAP adds as many as 10 additional hospital days and increases mortality rates by as much as 71%. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Seventy SS samples were collected from 15 subjects in a respiratory intensive care unit who were initially intubated with the Hi-Lo Evac(r) endotracheal tube during February and May 2000. Methods: SSs were obtained by continuous suction from the subglottic suction port of a Hi-Lo Evac(r) endotracheal tube. SS volume was measured in microliters per 24 hours. SS viscosity was measured in vitro by secretion transit time across an angled glass slide. Patient volume status was defined by 24-hour fluid balance, change in daily weight, BUN/creatinine ratio, salivary flow (assessed by visual analogue scale), and measured salivary volume. Findings: A significant relationship was found between SS volume and one measure of PVS, BUN/creatinine ratio, (r=.326; p <.01) and SS viscosity and salivary volume, (r=-.241; p=.207). Conclusions: Only one measure of PVS was associated with SS volume or SS viscosity indicating that other factors, not tested here, influence SS accumulation viscosity. Implications: This study is pioneering work in the area of identifying a comprehensive understanding of factors associated with SS accumulation and removal with the anticipation of decreasing and preventing ventilator associated pneumonia.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Associated with Subglottic Secretion Accumulation and Removal among Mechanically Ventilated Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154738-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Associated with Subglottic Secretion Accumulation and Removal among Mechanically Ventilated Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">O'Neal, Pamela</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Gordon College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Division Chair and Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">poneal@mail.maconstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: To describe the relationship between subglottic secretion (SS) volume and patient volume status (PVS) and to describe the relationship between SS viscosity and PVS. Design: A descriptive design was used since these is pioneering research. Concepts Studied: Potentially pathogenic SSs pool above and leak around the folds of the endotracheal tube cuff during intubation and predispose the patient to ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Identifying factors associated with SS accumulation and removal may delay and prevent VAP occurrence. Over 90% of mechanically ventilated patients acquire nosocomial pneumonia, VAP adds as many as 10 additional hospital days and increases mortality rates by as much as 71%. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Seventy SS samples were collected from 15 subjects in a respiratory intensive care unit who were initially intubated with the Hi-Lo Evac(r) endotracheal tube during February and May 2000. Methods: SSs were obtained by continuous suction from the subglottic suction port of a Hi-Lo Evac(r) endotracheal tube. SS volume was measured in microliters per 24 hours. SS viscosity was measured in vitro by secretion transit time across an angled glass slide. Patient volume status was defined by 24-hour fluid balance, change in daily weight, BUN/creatinine ratio, salivary flow (assessed by visual analogue scale), and measured salivary volume. Findings: A significant relationship was found between SS volume and one measure of PVS, BUN/creatinine ratio, (r=.326; p &lt;.01) and SS viscosity and salivary volume, (r=-.241; p=.207). Conclusions: Only one measure of PVS was associated with SS volume or SS viscosity indicating that other factors, not tested here, influence SS accumulation viscosity. Implications: This study is pioneering work in the area of identifying a comprehensive understanding of factors associated with SS accumulation and removal with the anticipation of decreasing and preventing ventilator associated pneumonia.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:14:18Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:14:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.