Theory of Planned Behavior Models for Breastfeeding Duration among Hong Kong Mothers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154739
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Theory of Planned Behavior Models for Breastfeeding Duration among Hong Kong Mothers
Abstract:
Theory of Planned Behavior Models for Breastfeeding Duration among Hong Kong Mothers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Dodgson, Joan, MN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hong Kong
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: To evaluate cross-cultural application of Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB)-based explanatory models for breastfeeding among new mothers in Hong Kong. Design: Longitudinal self-report surveys were used to measure the TPB variables with data collection points while participants were in the hospital, at 1, 3,and 6 months postpartum or until they weaned. Population, Sample, Setting: Two hundred first-time breastfeeding women, who delivered normal healthy newborns in two major urban medical centers participated. All participants were Hong Kong residents, spoke Cantonese and read the Chinese language. Data collection occurred in 2000-2001. Concepts: The theory of planned behavior (TPB) has been used to study breastfeeding in Western cultures; however, theoretically based investigations in other groups are sparse. The model provides a well tested framework that examines the influences of beliefs about outcomes, control beliefs, referent beliefs on attitude, perceived behavioral control and subjective norm, which in turn influence one's intention to perform a specific health promotion behavior (breastfeeding) and the final outcome measure, performance of a specific health-promoting behavior (breastfeeding duration). Method: After obtaining informed consent, participants completed a survey in Chinese, containing scaled items measuring each of the TPB variables. Telephone follow-ups were done at each data collection point and were conducted in Cantonese. The tools used had been well tested in Western English-speaking populations, but had never been used in Chinese populations. Tools were translated into Chinese and then back translated to ensure accuracy. Content experts reviewed the Chinese version for cultural relevance as well as content. Cronbach alphas on the various scales that measured the TPB variables in this sample ranged between .80-.92. LISREL was used to estimate structural equation models. Findings: A series of models was estimated and evaluated, using theory, clinical insight, and patterns in the data as guides. The most satisfactory model posited perceived behavioral control as a critical factor linking a mother's motivation for breastfeeding with intended and actual duration of breastfeeding. All paths in the model were significant (p < .05), overall fit was adequate (GOFI=.95), and residuals were small (average RMSR=.06). Model explained variance was highest for perceived behavioral control (R2=.40) and breastfeeding duration (R2=.30). Conclusions: Models were interpreted in light of the TPB, previous findings, and the social context for breastfeeding in Hong Kong. The socio-cultural context in Hong Kong may have a mediating role in breastfeeding duration in this setting. The TPB model is useful in cross-cultural research. Implications: Cross-cultural measurement issues and the need for prospective study design are continuing challenges in breastfeeding research.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTheory of Planned Behavior Models for Breastfeeding Duration among Hong Kong Mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154739-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Theory of Planned Behavior Models for Breastfeeding Duration among Hong Kong Mothers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dodgson, Joan, MN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hong Kong</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jdodgson@netvigator.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To evaluate cross-cultural application of Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB)-based explanatory models for breastfeeding among new mothers in Hong Kong. Design: Longitudinal self-report surveys were used to measure the TPB variables with data collection points while participants were in the hospital, at 1, 3,and 6 months postpartum or until they weaned. Population, Sample, Setting: Two hundred first-time breastfeeding women, who delivered normal healthy newborns in two major urban medical centers participated. All participants were Hong Kong residents, spoke Cantonese and read the Chinese language. Data collection occurred in 2000-2001. Concepts: The theory of planned behavior (TPB) has been used to study breastfeeding in Western cultures; however, theoretically based investigations in other groups are sparse. The model provides a well tested framework that examines the influences of beliefs about outcomes, control beliefs, referent beliefs on attitude, perceived behavioral control and subjective norm, which in turn influence one's intention to perform a specific health promotion behavior (breastfeeding) and the final outcome measure, performance of a specific health-promoting behavior (breastfeeding duration). Method: After obtaining informed consent, participants completed a survey in Chinese, containing scaled items measuring each of the TPB variables. Telephone follow-ups were done at each data collection point and were conducted in Cantonese. The tools used had been well tested in Western English-speaking populations, but had never been used in Chinese populations. Tools were translated into Chinese and then back translated to ensure accuracy. Content experts reviewed the Chinese version for cultural relevance as well as content. Cronbach alphas on the various scales that measured the TPB variables in this sample ranged between .80-.92. LISREL was used to estimate structural equation models. Findings: A series of models was estimated and evaluated, using theory, clinical insight, and patterns in the data as guides. The most satisfactory model posited perceived behavioral control as a critical factor linking a mother's motivation for breastfeeding with intended and actual duration of breastfeeding. All paths in the model were significant (p &lt; .05), overall fit was adequate (GOFI=.95), and residuals were small (average RMSR=.06). Model explained variance was highest for perceived behavioral control (R2=.40) and breastfeeding duration (R2=.30). Conclusions: Models were interpreted in light of the TPB, previous findings, and the social context for breastfeeding in Hong Kong. The socio-cultural context in Hong Kong may have a mediating role in breastfeeding duration in this setting. The TPB model is useful in cross-cultural research. Implications: Cross-cultural measurement issues and the need for prospective study design are continuing challenges in breastfeeding research.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:14:21Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:14:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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