2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154741
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of the Strengthening Families Program with Native American Families
Abstract:
Effects of the Strengthening Families Program with Native American Families
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Erickson, Julie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: Interventions aimed at substance abuse prevention among youth are likely to be more effective when both children and their parents participate. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of the Strengthening Families Program (SFP developed by Iowa State University Extension) on 1) parenting skills and 2) youth's drug use, interpersonal as well as personal skills among Native American families. Design: A longitudinal design using pre-intervention, post intervention (after seven sessions) and follow-up (after four booster sessions) surveys was used. The SFP includes eleven, two hour sessions delivered over six months. Parents and youth meet separately with trained interventionists for the first hour. Parent topics include making house rules, using consequences and protecting against drug use. Youth topics include having goals, following rules and handling peer pressure. Families practice skills and have fun together during the second hour. Sample: The convenience sample included 18 parents (15 mothers, 3 fathers) and 24 youth (12 boys, 12 girls) recruited from a Native American community. The program was implemented in 2000-2001. Concepts: Concepts for parents included specific parenting skills (setting appropriate limits, building positive relationships with their child); general child management (setting rules, following through with consequences); and positive feelings towards their child. Concepts for youth included interpersonal skills (handling peer pressure; friendships); personal skills (goal setting, dealing with stress); positive feelings towards parents; and, actual drug use. Methods: Paired comparisons and ANOVA with repeated measures examined survey responses. Parents responded to the SFP Parent/Care Giver Survey with 20 items measuring frequency of behaviors. Youth responded to the SFP Youth Survey with 14 items measuring behavior frequency. Findings: From pre to post, parents had significant increases (p<.048) in 15 of 20 behaviors including 'letting the child know specifically what I expect regarding drug use'. Youth had significant increases (p<.03) in 9 of 14 behaviors including managing pressures but not including 'knowing what my parents think I should do about drugs'. Actual drug use by youth was rare at each survey administration. Increases in most behaviors were maintained through follow-up. Conclusions: SFP increases skills among Native American youth and their parents. Drug use by youth was neither initiated nor increased during program participation. Implications: Nurses should focus on family units in drug prevention. Successful prevention efforts may include parenting skills and child skills as well as time spent together for practice and fun.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of the Strengthening Families Program with Native American Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154741-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of the Strengthening Families Program with Native American Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Erickson, Julie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">erickson@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Interventions aimed at substance abuse prevention among youth are likely to be more effective when both children and their parents participate. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of the Strengthening Families Program (SFP developed by Iowa State University Extension) on 1) parenting skills and 2) youth's drug use, interpersonal as well as personal skills among Native American families. Design: A longitudinal design using pre-intervention, post intervention (after seven sessions) and follow-up (after four booster sessions) surveys was used. The SFP includes eleven, two hour sessions delivered over six months. Parents and youth meet separately with trained interventionists for the first hour. Parent topics include making house rules, using consequences and protecting against drug use. Youth topics include having goals, following rules and handling peer pressure. Families practice skills and have fun together during the second hour. Sample: The convenience sample included 18 parents (15 mothers, 3 fathers) and 24 youth (12 boys, 12 girls) recruited from a Native American community. The program was implemented in 2000-2001. Concepts: Concepts for parents included specific parenting skills (setting appropriate limits, building positive relationships with their child); general child management (setting rules, following through with consequences); and positive feelings towards their child. Concepts for youth included interpersonal skills (handling peer pressure; friendships); personal skills (goal setting, dealing with stress); positive feelings towards parents; and, actual drug use. Methods: Paired comparisons and ANOVA with repeated measures examined survey responses. Parents responded to the SFP Parent/Care Giver Survey with 20 items measuring frequency of behaviors. Youth responded to the SFP Youth Survey with 14 items measuring behavior frequency. Findings: From pre to post, parents had significant increases (p&lt;.048) in 15 of 20 behaviors including 'letting the child know specifically what I expect regarding drug use'. Youth had significant increases (p&lt;.03) in 9 of 14 behaviors including managing pressures but not including 'knowing what my parents think I should do about drugs'. Actual drug use by youth was rare at each survey administration. Increases in most behaviors were maintained through follow-up. Conclusions: SFP increases skills among Native American youth and their parents. Drug use by youth was neither initiated nor increased during program participation. Implications: Nurses should focus on family units in drug prevention. Successful prevention efforts may include parenting skills and child skills as well as time spent together for practice and fun.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:14:27Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:14:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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