Prevalence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors among a Group of Mississippi Children in the 3rd, 4th, and 5th Grades

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154742
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prevalence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors among a Group of Mississippi Children in the 3rd, 4th, and 5th Grades
Abstract:
Prevalence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors among a Group of Mississippi Children in the 3rd, 4th, and 5th Grades
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Davis, Sheila
P.I. Institution Name:University of Mississippi Medical Center
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: The objective of this research is to identify children who are at risk for cardiovascular disease based upon anthropometric measurements, blood pressures, and health history of children and their parents. Presently (2001), the state of Mississippi leads the nation in deaths due to cardiovascular disease. It is proposed that if children at risk are identified early, then intervention strategies can be incorporated to significantly reduce this health challenge. Design: Research design is cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population included all children and parents (guardians) in the third, fourth, and fifth grades in two randomly chosen elementary schools in Jackson, Mississippi. Due to the zoning of Jackson schools, 100% of children in the sample were African American. The actual sample consisted of 246 children. This research was conducted in 2000. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variable(s): To answer the question: What is the prevalence of children with cardiovascular risk factors in two Mississippi schools? variables studied were: 1) BMI, 2) Blood Pressure, 3) Triceps skin fold, 4) and a 22 item researcher-generated Family Health History Questionnaire. Methods: Following IRB approval, meetings with school superintendents, principals, and teachers, to explain the study, letters and consent forms were sent to parents for signatures of consent. Upon receipt of signed consent forms, children were scheduled for testing. The Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in Children group (CRRIC) used research-tested methods to devise the protocols for collection of anthropometric and blood pressure measurements. The 22-item CRRIC health history consisted of researcher-generated questions and four questions used per permission of the National Children and Youth Fitness Study II. All items on the heath history were supported by the research literature. Any item not reaching consensus by the group was omitted from the health history. Parents (guardians) completed the health history and returned it via a stamped, self-addressed envelope addressed to the researcher. All children in the third, fourth, and fifth grades received a copy of the booklet, Al's Story: Overcoming Childhood Obesity, regardless of their participation in the study. Following a training session by the principal investigator and nutritionist, two senior nursing students, a pediatric nurse practitioner, a pediatric clinical nurse specialist, a graduate nursing student, a nutritionist, a cardiovascular nurse specialist, a certified health educator, and several generalist nurse faculty collected data on children. Data collection was conducted over a four-day period for the two schools. Parents (guardians) of children at-risk as determined by BMI and /or blood pressure were sent written correspondences. Findings: Results of the study revealed that approximately 16% of the boys had systolic blood pressures at or above the 90th percentile for sex and age. In addition, 13% of the boys experienced diastolic blood pressures at or above the 90th percentile for sex and age. Conversely, 21% had diastolic blood pressures at or above the 90th percentile for sex and age. Regarding BMI, 39% of the boys and 49% of the girls had BMI measurements at or above the 85th percentile. The national average for BMIs is 25% at the 85th percentile for boys and girls. Responses to the sociocultural questions of the health history revealed that the majority of children ate at fast food restaurants at least twice per week. Forty-seven percent of the children watched two or more hours of TV on most weekdays. Predominant health history problems were the triad of obesity, diabetes, and blood pressure. This was especially true for grandparents. Other results indicated that over 50% of parents had at least a high school education and above, there were parks and other recreational facilities in the neighborhood, and the majority of the sample attended social religious activities at least once per week. Conclusions: Clearly, these children are at risk for development of cardiovascular disease based upon BMI measurements, strong family history, and racial mix. Also, given that the state of Mississippi is one of the leading states in the nation in deaths due to heart disease, unless a decided intervention is begun with this generation, the accompanying risk factors of diabetes, hypertension, and athrogenic problems will surface in younger and younger groups. Implications: It is encumbered upon nursing to form alliances with other disciplines in order to address this burgeoning problem of cardiovascular risks in children. CRRIC recommends careful study to culturally appropriate, family-centered, school-based, initiatives aimed to reduce cardiovascular risks that focus on decrease of sedentary behaviors, dietary modifications, and increase of physical activity.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrevalence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors among a Group of Mississippi Children in the 3rd, 4th, and 5th Gradesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154742-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prevalence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors among a Group of Mississippi Children in the 3rd, 4th, and 5th Grades</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davis, Sheila</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Mississippi Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sdavis@son.umsmed.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of this research is to identify children who are at risk for cardiovascular disease based upon anthropometric measurements, blood pressures, and health history of children and their parents. Presently (2001), the state of Mississippi leads the nation in deaths due to cardiovascular disease. It is proposed that if children at risk are identified early, then intervention strategies can be incorporated to significantly reduce this health challenge. Design: Research design is cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population included all children and parents (guardians) in the third, fourth, and fifth grades in two randomly chosen elementary schools in Jackson, Mississippi. Due to the zoning of Jackson schools, 100% of children in the sample were African American. The actual sample consisted of 246 children. This research was conducted in 2000. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variable(s): To answer the question: What is the prevalence of children with cardiovascular risk factors in two Mississippi schools? variables studied were: 1) BMI, 2) Blood Pressure, 3) Triceps skin fold, 4) and a 22 item researcher-generated Family Health History Questionnaire. Methods: Following IRB approval, meetings with school superintendents, principals, and teachers, to explain the study, letters and consent forms were sent to parents for signatures of consent. Upon receipt of signed consent forms, children were scheduled for testing. The Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in Children group (CRRIC) used research-tested methods to devise the protocols for collection of anthropometric and blood pressure measurements. The 22-item CRRIC health history consisted of researcher-generated questions and four questions used per permission of the National Children and Youth Fitness Study II. All items on the heath history were supported by the research literature. Any item not reaching consensus by the group was omitted from the health history. Parents (guardians) completed the health history and returned it via a stamped, self-addressed envelope addressed to the researcher. All children in the third, fourth, and fifth grades received a copy of the booklet, Al's Story: Overcoming Childhood Obesity, regardless of their participation in the study. Following a training session by the principal investigator and nutritionist, two senior nursing students, a pediatric nurse practitioner, a pediatric clinical nurse specialist, a graduate nursing student, a nutritionist, a cardiovascular nurse specialist, a certified health educator, and several generalist nurse faculty collected data on children. Data collection was conducted over a four-day period for the two schools. Parents (guardians) of children at-risk as determined by BMI and /or blood pressure were sent written correspondences. Findings: Results of the study revealed that approximately 16% of the boys had systolic blood pressures at or above the 90th percentile for sex and age. In addition, 13% of the boys experienced diastolic blood pressures at or above the 90th percentile for sex and age. Conversely, 21% had diastolic blood pressures at or above the 90th percentile for sex and age. Regarding BMI, 39% of the boys and 49% of the girls had BMI measurements at or above the 85th percentile. The national average for BMIs is 25% at the 85th percentile for boys and girls. Responses to the sociocultural questions of the health history revealed that the majority of children ate at fast food restaurants at least twice per week. Forty-seven percent of the children watched two or more hours of TV on most weekdays. Predominant health history problems were the triad of obesity, diabetes, and blood pressure. This was especially true for grandparents. Other results indicated that over 50% of parents had at least a high school education and above, there were parks and other recreational facilities in the neighborhood, and the majority of the sample attended social religious activities at least once per week. Conclusions: Clearly, these children are at risk for development of cardiovascular disease based upon BMI measurements, strong family history, and racial mix. Also, given that the state of Mississippi is one of the leading states in the nation in deaths due to heart disease, unless a decided intervention is begun with this generation, the accompanying risk factors of diabetes, hypertension, and athrogenic problems will surface in younger and younger groups. Implications: It is encumbered upon nursing to form alliances with other disciplines in order to address this burgeoning problem of cardiovascular risks in children. CRRIC recommends careful study to culturally appropriate, family-centered, school-based, initiatives aimed to reduce cardiovascular risks that focus on decrease of sedentary behaviors, dietary modifications, and increase of physical activity.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:14:30Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:14:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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