2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154744
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Immersing Undergraduate Nurses In Meaningful Field Research
Abstract:
Immersing Undergraduate Nurses In Meaningful Field Research
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Lofton, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:University of Mississippi Medical Center
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: To demonstrate a research role for undergraduate students in the clinical setting, achieved through active role participation in a large, funded community assessment research study. Design: As part of their course requirement students enrolled in a baccalaureate completion program research seminar course were data collectors for a large funded comprehensive community assessment project. After training students were placed in the field at commercial businesses throughout the county, in both rural and urban areas, for data collection purposes. Students collected data on three different dates. At the end of each data collection date, students gathered in an open faculty led seminar to discuss the day's research experience. Population: Twenty-six baccalaureate completion students participated in this study. The student population included twenty-three females and three males. The students had successfully completed one semester course (three semester hours) educational training in research prior to this experience. Sample: A convenience sample of all students enrolled in the professional practice seminar was utilized. Only those students who successfully completed training, and were determined through inter- rater reliability to be competent data collectors were considered. Ultimately, twenty-six baccalaureate completion undergraduate students participated. Setting: University of Mississippi School of Nursing, Jackson, Mississippi, USA provided the training site. Data collection occurred at commercial business sites in Hinds County, Mississippi, USA. Year: Summer, 2001. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Intervention variables included selection to site data collection teams, satisfactory inter-rater reliability score, and attendance on all data collection dates. Outcome variables included total, mean and standard deviation scores on evaluation of learning opportunity tool (course evaluation) at completion of the data collection. Methods: Students were provided a full day of training, which included the following components: orientation to course and research objectives, overview of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Grant (Communities in Charge) ethics related to interviews in research, safety in the community setting, review of data collection tool, developing interview techniques, role play interviews with expert researchers, and determination of inter-rater reliability. Conclusions: Preliminary findings reveal that undergraduate students experience a high degree of professional satisfaction when they are active participants in the research process. Community based research projects provide excellent opportunities for active student participation in the research process. Students were asked to rate the following question on a five point Likert scale: "Course objective was designed to build on my previous learning experience". Student response: 81% responded strongly agree or agree. Mean: 4.09. Standard deviation: 1.15. Findings: Data collection was completed in the summer of 2001. Data analysis will be completed in fall, 2001 and reported at the conference. Implications: Many undergraduate nursing curricula have minimal applied research experience for students. Student participants expressed satisfaction at participating in research outside the classroom setting. Many students stated that at the end of the research experience they had a new and different belief in the value of research as a mechanism for improving the health of a community. Faculty nurse researchers must creatively design undergraduate curriculums to include a role for student researchers in the clinical arena.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImmersing Undergraduate Nurses In Meaningful Field Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154744-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Immersing Undergraduate Nurses In Meaningful Field Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lofton, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Mississippi Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">slofton@son.usmed.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To demonstrate a research role for undergraduate students in the clinical setting, achieved through active role participation in a large, funded community assessment research study. Design: As part of their course requirement students enrolled in a baccalaureate completion program research seminar course were data collectors for a large funded comprehensive community assessment project. After training students were placed in the field at commercial businesses throughout the county, in both rural and urban areas, for data collection purposes. Students collected data on three different dates. At the end of each data collection date, students gathered in an open faculty led seminar to discuss the day's research experience. Population: Twenty-six baccalaureate completion students participated in this study. The student population included twenty-three females and three males. The students had successfully completed one semester course (three semester hours) educational training in research prior to this experience. Sample: A convenience sample of all students enrolled in the professional practice seminar was utilized. Only those students who successfully completed training, and were determined through inter- rater reliability to be competent data collectors were considered. Ultimately, twenty-six baccalaureate completion undergraduate students participated. Setting: University of Mississippi School of Nursing, Jackson, Mississippi, USA provided the training site. Data collection occurred at commercial business sites in Hinds County, Mississippi, USA. Year: Summer, 2001. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Intervention variables included selection to site data collection teams, satisfactory inter-rater reliability score, and attendance on all data collection dates. Outcome variables included total, mean and standard deviation scores on evaluation of learning opportunity tool (course evaluation) at completion of the data collection. Methods: Students were provided a full day of training, which included the following components: orientation to course and research objectives, overview of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Grant (Communities in Charge) ethics related to interviews in research, safety in the community setting, review of data collection tool, developing interview techniques, role play interviews with expert researchers, and determination of inter-rater reliability. Conclusions: Preliminary findings reveal that undergraduate students experience a high degree of professional satisfaction when they are active participants in the research process. Community based research projects provide excellent opportunities for active student participation in the research process. Students were asked to rate the following question on a five point Likert scale: &quot;Course objective was designed to build on my previous learning experience&quot;. Student response: 81% responded strongly agree or agree. Mean: 4.09. Standard deviation: 1.15. Findings: Data collection was completed in the summer of 2001. Data analysis will be completed in fall, 2001 and reported at the conference. Implications: Many undergraduate nursing curricula have minimal applied research experience for students. Student participants expressed satisfaction at participating in research outside the classroom setting. Many students stated that at the end of the research experience they had a new and different belief in the value of research as a mechanism for improving the health of a community. Faculty nurse researchers must creatively design undergraduate curriculums to include a role for student researchers in the clinical arena.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:14:35Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:14:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.