Differences and Similarities of Self-Caring of Women with Osteoarthritis Living at Different Levels of Independence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154745
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Differences and Similarities of Self-Caring of Women with Osteoarthritis Living at Different Levels of Independence
Abstract:
Differences and Similarities of Self-Caring of Women with Osteoarthritis Living at Different Levels of Independence
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Baird, Carol, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: Successful management of chronic diseases may maintain health and foster continued independent living. Many older adults throughout the world have symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic disease in many countries. Living independently while caring for self with chronic disease is considered very important. In fact, American older adults report that the most important aspect of their quality of life is independence. Self-care is the principal and most basic form of primary care and includes many activities related to disease prevention, diagnosis, treatment and long-term, chronic management. One step in supporting self-care of chronic diseases, such as OA, is to study similarities and differences in self-care at various levels of independence. Design: A narrative, descriptive study based on naturalistic inquiry addressed the research questions: What are the self-caring behaviors of the three groups of older women with OA? and Are there differences in self-caring in the three groups of women. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Participants included women over 65 years of age with self-reported OA; 19 lived in houses or apartments in community, 16 lived in assisted-living apartments, and 25 lived in nursing homes. Methods: Women attending activities in older adult centers, assisted living apartments, and nursing homes were invited to participate. Informed consent was obtained. Each participant was interviewed, following a semi-structured interview guide, for 30 to 75 minutes. Data included the transcribed audiotaped interviews, fields notes, and descriptive data from those interviews. In addition to phenomenologic analysis, quantitative analysis was conducted and indicated similarities and differences in behaviors and self-caring attitude. Analysis of variance and Pearson correlation statistics were used. Findings: There were many significant differences and relationships. A few examples are given here. Community-residing women reported more fatigue, difficulty in sleeping, and difficulty in maintenance of homes. Women living in assisted living were more likely to use pain medication and to use canes. Women in nursing homes were more likely to use assistive devices, such as walkers and wheelchairs. Community-residing women were more likely to use humor and rely on spirituality. Women living in assisted-living environments were more likely to say they used determination to cope with their OA. Pearson correlations indicated many significant relationships. Examples of those findings are listed here. Women living in more independent environments reported significantly more difficulties than women living in less independent environments. Living in less independent environments was significantly correlated with difficulty standing. There were certain significant relationships between age and self-care behaviors, such as being younger was significantly related to taking medication for arthritis, having surgery for arthritis, and resting. There were also significant correlations between self-care behaviors, such as gardening, walking, for exercise, and letting others help. There were significant relationships between living environment and psychological strengths and also in negative thinking. Conclusions: Older women who live in the community have a greater number of functional difficulties than women living in environments with less independence. Older women who live in the community also report more depression. It is assumed that women who move to environments with more support for physical functioning and activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living report less difficulties because they do not have to rely on themselves as much. Implications: Findings were used in the development of an instrument, Measurement of Osteoarthritis Self-Care (MOSC), to measure self-caring and self-care self-efficacy of adults with OA. Findings may be informing for nurses to understand self-caring of older women with OA. Nurses may use findings to assist older adults with OA to care for themselves. Findings may also be useful to nurses in the development of interventions to promote independent living with OA.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDifferences and Similarities of Self-Caring of Women with Osteoarthritis Living at Different Levels of Independenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154745-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Differences and Similarities of Self-Caring of Women with Osteoarthritis Living at Different Levels of Independence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baird, Carol, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bairdcl@purdue.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Successful management of chronic diseases may maintain health and foster continued independent living. Many older adults throughout the world have symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic disease in many countries. Living independently while caring for self with chronic disease is considered very important. In fact, American older adults report that the most important aspect of their quality of life is independence. Self-care is the principal and most basic form of primary care and includes many activities related to disease prevention, diagnosis, treatment and long-term, chronic management. One step in supporting self-care of chronic diseases, such as OA, is to study similarities and differences in self-care at various levels of independence. Design: A narrative, descriptive study based on naturalistic inquiry addressed the research questions: What are the self-caring behaviors of the three groups of older women with OA? and Are there differences in self-caring in the three groups of women. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Participants included women over 65 years of age with self-reported OA; 19 lived in houses or apartments in community, 16 lived in assisted-living apartments, and 25 lived in nursing homes. Methods: Women attending activities in older adult centers, assisted living apartments, and nursing homes were invited to participate. Informed consent was obtained. Each participant was interviewed, following a semi-structured interview guide, for 30 to 75 minutes. Data included the transcribed audiotaped interviews, fields notes, and descriptive data from those interviews. In addition to phenomenologic analysis, quantitative analysis was conducted and indicated similarities and differences in behaviors and self-caring attitude. Analysis of variance and Pearson correlation statistics were used. Findings: There were many significant differences and relationships. A few examples are given here. Community-residing women reported more fatigue, difficulty in sleeping, and difficulty in maintenance of homes. Women living in assisted living were more likely to use pain medication and to use canes. Women in nursing homes were more likely to use assistive devices, such as walkers and wheelchairs. Community-residing women were more likely to use humor and rely on spirituality. Women living in assisted-living environments were more likely to say they used determination to cope with their OA. Pearson correlations indicated many significant relationships. Examples of those findings are listed here. Women living in more independent environments reported significantly more difficulties than women living in less independent environments. Living in less independent environments was significantly correlated with difficulty standing. There were certain significant relationships between age and self-care behaviors, such as being younger was significantly related to taking medication for arthritis, having surgery for arthritis, and resting. There were also significant correlations between self-care behaviors, such as gardening, walking, for exercise, and letting others help. There were significant relationships between living environment and psychological strengths and also in negative thinking. Conclusions: Older women who live in the community have a greater number of functional difficulties than women living in environments with less independence. Older women who live in the community also report more depression. It is assumed that women who move to environments with more support for physical functioning and activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living report less difficulties because they do not have to rely on themselves as much. Implications: Findings were used in the development of an instrument, Measurement of Osteoarthritis Self-Care (MOSC), to measure self-caring and self-care self-efficacy of adults with OA. Findings may be informing for nurses to understand self-caring of older women with OA. Nurses may use findings to assist older adults with OA to care for themselves. Findings may also be useful to nurses in the development of interventions to promote independent living with OA.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:14:38Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:14:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.