2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154746
Type:
Presentation
Title:
South Asian Women's Experiences with Abnormal Pap Smears
Abstract:
South Asian Women's Experiences with Abnormal Pap Smears
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Singh, Savitri
P.I. Institution Name:University of British Columbia
This presentation will discuss the findings from a study conducted in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, which explored the health care experiences of South Asia women who had received an abnormal Pap test. The sample was drawn from South Asian women who had attended one of two colposcopy clinics for follow-up diagnostic procedures following an abnormal Pap test result. The findings provide insight regarding how South Asian women make sense of receiving an abnormal Pap test in light of their past experiences. A discussion of the results and subsequent implications will be presented. There is a variety of evidence emerging which leads to the importance to describe South Asian women's experiences associated with the receipt of abnormal cervical screening results within the context of current health care services and structures. First there is evidence that indicates some South Asian women are reluctant to seek Pap testing from their male physicians. Furthermore, some male physicians avoid topics related to gynecological issues out of respect for women's modesty and comfort. Finally there is evidence of psychological distress related to abnormal Pap tests. These key points regarding barriers to discussing matters related to gynecological health and psychological stress supports further assessment of their perceptions concerning adequacy of information, counseling and support provided by health care professionals. The purpose of this study is to describe South Asian women's experiences in the context of receiving abnormal Pap test results and follow-up diagnostic evaluations. This study used ethnography as a methodology to aid in exploring the context of culture that is interwoven into how South Asian women are different from other groups of women. The technique of purposive and snowball sampling was used in order to ensure that South Asian women who were included in the study had received an abnormal Pap test and follow-up examination in a variety of circumstances, and those who were willing and able to share their experiences. A total of twelve South Asian women, participated in the study, ranging in age from twenty-two to fifty-six years of age. Thirteen health care interviews included two family physicians, five gynecologists, and six nurses. A semi-structured open-ended interview process was used to elicit a description of how women's experiences differ. A rigorous thematic data analysis process ensured development of rich descriptions, which can inform future health care workers strategic ways of putting together educational materials that are informative to this particular population. The key themes reflecting South Asian women's experiences are discussed within the following areas: 1) notification of the Pap test results 2) trying to find an explanation for the problem 3) women's thoughts on cancer in the context of an abnormal Pap smear, and 4) culture as it influences health care access. Findings show that most South Asian women in this study had received an abnormal Pap smear in the context of other gynecological related problems. Previous exposure to cancer led some women to have fear of getting the 'disease', cancer, leading them to believe that an abnormal Pap test result equaled cancer. Most women brought from their country of origin diverse experiences of how health care is accessed and viewed, which shadowed how they viewed screening and an abnormal result. Language and the lack of interpreters made the delivery of health care to this population difficult for some health care providers. There are a number of recommendations that can be made from this study. Recommendations address the health care system structuring concerning policies that related to accessibility and development of education materials, accessibility of interpretive services, and the clinical environments, which are serving diverse female cliental. Thus making health care delivery culturally safe, acceptable, and easier to access by all the different populations served by the health care system. As well there are recommendations, which are relevant to nursing practice, nursing education, nursing research, and health care policy. These implications will be discussed in detail in the presented paper with attention being paid toward community development and enhancement through workshops with the existing clinics, health care providers, and the South Asian community.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSouth Asian Women's Experiences with Abnormal Pap Smearsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154746-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">South Asian Women's Experiences with Abnormal Pap Smears</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Singh, Savitri</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of British Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">saveetree@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This presentation will discuss the findings from a study conducted in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, which explored the health care experiences of South Asia women who had received an abnormal Pap test. The sample was drawn from South Asian women who had attended one of two colposcopy clinics for follow-up diagnostic procedures following an abnormal Pap test result. The findings provide insight regarding how South Asian women make sense of receiving an abnormal Pap test in light of their past experiences. A discussion of the results and subsequent implications will be presented. There is a variety of evidence emerging which leads to the importance to describe South Asian women's experiences associated with the receipt of abnormal cervical screening results within the context of current health care services and structures. First there is evidence that indicates some South Asian women are reluctant to seek Pap testing from their male physicians. Furthermore, some male physicians avoid topics related to gynecological issues out of respect for women's modesty and comfort. Finally there is evidence of psychological distress related to abnormal Pap tests. These key points regarding barriers to discussing matters related to gynecological health and psychological stress supports further assessment of their perceptions concerning adequacy of information, counseling and support provided by health care professionals. The purpose of this study is to describe South Asian women's experiences in the context of receiving abnormal Pap test results and follow-up diagnostic evaluations. This study used ethnography as a methodology to aid in exploring the context of culture that is interwoven into how South Asian women are different from other groups of women. The technique of purposive and snowball sampling was used in order to ensure that South Asian women who were included in the study had received an abnormal Pap test and follow-up examination in a variety of circumstances, and those who were willing and able to share their experiences. A total of twelve South Asian women, participated in the study, ranging in age from twenty-two to fifty-six years of age. Thirteen health care interviews included two family physicians, five gynecologists, and six nurses. A semi-structured open-ended interview process was used to elicit a description of how women's experiences differ. A rigorous thematic data analysis process ensured development of rich descriptions, which can inform future health care workers strategic ways of putting together educational materials that are informative to this particular population. The key themes reflecting South Asian women's experiences are discussed within the following areas: 1) notification of the Pap test results 2) trying to find an explanation for the problem 3) women's thoughts on cancer in the context of an abnormal Pap smear, and 4) culture as it influences health care access. Findings show that most South Asian women in this study had received an abnormal Pap smear in the context of other gynecological related problems. Previous exposure to cancer led some women to have fear of getting the 'disease', cancer, leading them to believe that an abnormal Pap test result equaled cancer. Most women brought from their country of origin diverse experiences of how health care is accessed and viewed, which shadowed how they viewed screening and an abnormal result. Language and the lack of interpreters made the delivery of health care to this population difficult for some health care providers. There are a number of recommendations that can be made from this study. Recommendations address the health care system structuring concerning policies that related to accessibility and development of education materials, accessibility of interpretive services, and the clinical environments, which are serving diverse female cliental. Thus making health care delivery culturally safe, acceptable, and easier to access by all the different populations served by the health care system. As well there are recommendations, which are relevant to nursing practice, nursing education, nursing research, and health care policy. These implications will be discussed in detail in the presented paper with attention being paid toward community development and enhancement through workshops with the existing clinics, health care providers, and the South Asian community.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:14:41Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:14:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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