2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154747
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Efficacy of Significant Others in Management of Chronic Illness
Abstract:
Self-Efficacy of Significant Others in Management of Chronic Illness
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie
P.I. Institution Name:Pace University
Title:Professor and Director
Objective: To develop and validate instruments to measure self-efficacy of significant others in assisting family members and others with management of a chronic illnesses. Design: Methodological study with one time administration or instruments for testing internal consistency and test-retest for stability was used for each instrument for different age groups and for one chronic illness, type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The initial instrument development and testing began in the United States in 1990 and has continued in United States and other countries. The sample size varied for the different self-efficacy scales, but ranged from 25 to 105. For self-efficacy of significant other of children with diabetes mellitus, the instrument discussed in detail in this presentation, the sample was 103. Concept or Variables Studied together or Interventions and Outcome Variables: Instruments were developed for to measure self-efficacy of significant others, often the caregivers, in management of chronic. The key variable being studied was self-efficacy, a theory developed by Albert Bandura in 1977, is a person's confidence in own ability to perform a task. For these scales, the self-efficacy of the significant others were assessed, that is, there confidence in assisting a family member to manage their chronic illness. For this presentation, the focus will be on parents of a child with diabetes mellitus and management of their condition. The psychometric properties of these were assessed so that they could be used in intervention programs. Methods: Each of the scales was submitted to expert panels and the content validity index calculated. The number of items for each scale for each area ranged from 23-35. Instruments were then administrated to a sample to obtain the psychometric estimates. There had been many changes in the national guidelines for nutrition, for example, using the pyramid instead of the basic four-food group, and physical fitness, for example, type of activities and frequency. In addition, there are different stressors. Therefore, these scales needed to be reviewed and revised as appropriate for continued use. The same process is being followed for the revalidation of scales in other languages, countries, and conditions. Findings: The findings for the self-efficacy of parents of children with diabetes mellitus have been selected for presentation in this paper. The content validity index was high for all the instruments. The Cronbach's alpha for the self-efficacy scales for significant others have ranged from .89 to .95 in different samples and for different scales. Other findings were similar although not this close for the other validation tests with the scales. The validations with different age groups and the underserved and at risk populations are in progress. Conclusions: Scales to measure self-efficacy have been developed and tested with good psychometric estimates for self-efficacy in significant others for management of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitu. Validation for use with other age groups and underserved and at risk populations is in progress. Extensive work has been done, for example, related to management self-efficacy for diabetes mellitus. Implications: Measures can be used as pre- and post-test assessment of diabetes mellitus programs. The method used for the development of scales can be used for developing scales for work with other chronic illnesses. Although the process is long, quality measures of key variables are essential to evaluate effectiveness of programs.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Efficacy of Significant Others in Management of Chronic Illnessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154747-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Efficacy of Significant Others in Management of Chronic Illness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Pace University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lshortridge@pace.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To develop and validate instruments to measure self-efficacy of significant others in assisting family members and others with management of a chronic illnesses. Design: Methodological study with one time administration or instruments for testing internal consistency and test-retest for stability was used for each instrument for different age groups and for one chronic illness, type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The initial instrument development and testing began in the United States in 1990 and has continued in United States and other countries. The sample size varied for the different self-efficacy scales, but ranged from 25 to 105. For self-efficacy of significant other of children with diabetes mellitus, the instrument discussed in detail in this presentation, the sample was 103. Concept or Variables Studied together or Interventions and Outcome Variables: Instruments were developed for to measure self-efficacy of significant others, often the caregivers, in management of chronic. The key variable being studied was self-efficacy, a theory developed by Albert Bandura in 1977, is a person's confidence in own ability to perform a task. For these scales, the self-efficacy of the significant others were assessed, that is, there confidence in assisting a family member to manage their chronic illness. For this presentation, the focus will be on parents of a child with diabetes mellitus and management of their condition. The psychometric properties of these were assessed so that they could be used in intervention programs. Methods: Each of the scales was submitted to expert panels and the content validity index calculated. The number of items for each scale for each area ranged from 23-35. Instruments were then administrated to a sample to obtain the psychometric estimates. There had been many changes in the national guidelines for nutrition, for example, using the pyramid instead of the basic four-food group, and physical fitness, for example, type of activities and frequency. In addition, there are different stressors. Therefore, these scales needed to be reviewed and revised as appropriate for continued use. The same process is being followed for the revalidation of scales in other languages, countries, and conditions. Findings: The findings for the self-efficacy of parents of children with diabetes mellitus have been selected for presentation in this paper. The content validity index was high for all the instruments. The Cronbach's alpha for the self-efficacy scales for significant others have ranged from .89 to .95 in different samples and for different scales. Other findings were similar although not this close for the other validation tests with the scales. The validations with different age groups and the underserved and at risk populations are in progress. Conclusions: Scales to measure self-efficacy have been developed and tested with good psychometric estimates for self-efficacy in significant others for management of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitu. Validation for use with other age groups and underserved and at risk populations is in progress. Extensive work has been done, for example, related to management self-efficacy for diabetes mellitus. Implications: Measures can be used as pre- and post-test assessment of diabetes mellitus programs. The method used for the development of scales can be used for developing scales for work with other chronic illnesses. Although the process is long, quality measures of key variables are essential to evaluate effectiveness of programs.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:14:44Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:14:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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