Analyzing the Corpus of Nursing Research Literature: Borrowed Genres or Tools for Practice?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154750
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Analyzing the Corpus of Nursing Research Literature: Borrowed Genres or Tools for Practice?
Abstract:
Analyzing the Corpus of Nursing Research Literature: Borrowed Genres or Tools for Practice?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Hamilton, Patricia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Texas Woman's University
Title:Professor
Objectives To: 1. identify significant scientific achievements made through nursing research; 2. describe and quantify categories of nursing research recently conducted; 3. provide recommendations for strategies to make nursing research more relevant to current health needs of individuals and populations. Design: This exploratory and descriptive study will characterize and evaluate contemporary nursing research and will obtain the views of nurse educators, students and practitioners as to its relevance now and for the future. Population and Sample Reports of nursing research will be obtained using electronic data base searching strategies. The study period is 1980 through 2000. Nursing research will be defined as research appearing in journals whose focus is nursing scholarship and/or research. Only studies in which data were collected and analyzed will be classified as research. All such studies will be included. Review articles, opinion pieces, philosophical arguments and other types of writing not directly reporting the results of original investigation will be excluded. Focus group convenience samples will be drawn from faculty and students from five universities offering graduate programs in nursing in north central Texas. Concepts: The study will focus on the following concepts: 1. scientific achievement 2. nursing research 3. study designs 4. health needs of individuals and populations. Method(s): In order to achieve the objectives of the project, the following methods will be used: 1. review of key nursing textbooks and journals for cases of exemplary nursing research; [This will be done by identifying the nursing research texts currently used in the nursing programs from which the focus group samples will be drawn. Investigators will review the texts and identify those studies used in the texts as exemplary in the areas of design, methodology, etc.] 2. focus groups conducted with nursing faculty, students and practitioners to determine opinions regarding significant scientific achievements derived from nursing research and ways to make nursing research more relevant in the future ; [The focus group discussions will be lead by the investigators. The following questions will serve to initiate discussion. What do you think is Nursing's most significant research achievement? How relevant do you find nursing research to be to your practice? What suggestions would you make for the future of nursing research?] 3. data base searches to identify current categories of nursing research ( descriptive, model-testing, instrument development, experimental, etc) and their prevalence in the literature [The categorization of a study will be based on the title, the abstract and keywords. The large number of studies reported during the period 1980-2000 makes it impossible to read the full text of each article.] Findings: Preliminary study has revealed surprising results in two areas. First, graduate and undergraduate students as well as faculty in two universities were polled regarding significant scientific achievements derived through nursing research. The majority of respondents were unable to name even one such achievement. Perhaps this fact is understandable in light of the second finding that only 5% of all nursing research conducted from 1980 through 2000 could be classified as experimental or as outcome evaluation. The balance of the research was conducted to describe a phenomenon, develop a measurement tool or test a theoretical model. Conclusions: It appears that the majority of nursing research being reported is prepatory to designing and testing effective nursing interventions. Yet, because of the practice nature of nursing, such studies are often not seen as relevant or significant for scientific advancement of the field. Implications: While the more prevalent preliminary types of research are important, it is fair to question whether they lead to changes in practice or policy of relevance to the health of individuals and populations within a reasonable time. Florence Nightingale conducted her first descriptive and epidemiological studies over 150 years ago. Since that time nursing has experienced profound changes in the areas of education, practice and professional roles. Some would argue that nursing is a relatively "young" academic field and, thus, should not be expected to have produced a large number of noteworthy research achievements up to now. Others might assert that the current corpus of nursing research represents a genre whose roots lie in psychology and the social sciences, fields with a minor practice focus. Such a genre may be counter-productive for significant scientific achievements in nursing. Regardless of the position taken on the relevance of nursing research today and its fate tomorrow, this study will provide empirical evidence about the state of the science. This evidence will stimulate a healthy dialectic regarding the most appropriate goals and strategies for future research in nursing.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnalyzing the Corpus of Nursing Research Literature: Borrowed Genres or Tools for Practice?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154750-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Analyzing the Corpus of Nursing Research Literature: Borrowed Genres or Tools for Practice?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hamilton, Patricia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Texas Woman's University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">phamilton@twu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives To: 1. identify significant scientific achievements made through nursing research; 2. describe and quantify categories of nursing research recently conducted; 3. provide recommendations for strategies to make nursing research more relevant to current health needs of individuals and populations. Design: This exploratory and descriptive study will characterize and evaluate contemporary nursing research and will obtain the views of nurse educators, students and practitioners as to its relevance now and for the future. Population and Sample Reports of nursing research will be obtained using electronic data base searching strategies. The study period is 1980 through 2000. Nursing research will be defined as research appearing in journals whose focus is nursing scholarship and/or research. Only studies in which data were collected and analyzed will be classified as research. All such studies will be included. Review articles, opinion pieces, philosophical arguments and other types of writing not directly reporting the results of original investigation will be excluded. Focus group convenience samples will be drawn from faculty and students from five universities offering graduate programs in nursing in north central Texas. Concepts: The study will focus on the following concepts: 1. scientific achievement 2. nursing research 3. study designs 4. health needs of individuals and populations. Method(s): In order to achieve the objectives of the project, the following methods will be used: 1. review of key nursing textbooks and journals for cases of exemplary nursing research; [This will be done by identifying the nursing research texts currently used in the nursing programs from which the focus group samples will be drawn. Investigators will review the texts and identify those studies used in the texts as exemplary in the areas of design, methodology, etc.] 2. focus groups conducted with nursing faculty, students and practitioners to determine opinions regarding significant scientific achievements derived from nursing research and ways to make nursing research more relevant in the future ; [The focus group discussions will be lead by the investigators. The following questions will serve to initiate discussion. What do you think is Nursing's most significant research achievement? How relevant do you find nursing research to be to your practice? What suggestions would you make for the future of nursing research?] 3. data base searches to identify current categories of nursing research ( descriptive, model-testing, instrument development, experimental, etc) and their prevalence in the literature [The categorization of a study will be based on the title, the abstract and keywords. The large number of studies reported during the period 1980-2000 makes it impossible to read the full text of each article.] Findings: Preliminary study has revealed surprising results in two areas. First, graduate and undergraduate students as well as faculty in two universities were polled regarding significant scientific achievements derived through nursing research. The majority of respondents were unable to name even one such achievement. Perhaps this fact is understandable in light of the second finding that only 5% of all nursing research conducted from 1980 through 2000 could be classified as experimental or as outcome evaluation. The balance of the research was conducted to describe a phenomenon, develop a measurement tool or test a theoretical model. Conclusions: It appears that the majority of nursing research being reported is prepatory to designing and testing effective nursing interventions. Yet, because of the practice nature of nursing, such studies are often not seen as relevant or significant for scientific advancement of the field. Implications: While the more prevalent preliminary types of research are important, it is fair to question whether they lead to changes in practice or policy of relevance to the health of individuals and populations within a reasonable time. Florence Nightingale conducted her first descriptive and epidemiological studies over 150 years ago. Since that time nursing has experienced profound changes in the areas of education, practice and professional roles. Some would argue that nursing is a relatively &quot;young&quot; academic field and, thus, should not be expected to have produced a large number of noteworthy research achievements up to now. Others might assert that the current corpus of nursing research represents a genre whose roots lie in psychology and the social sciences, fields with a minor practice focus. Such a genre may be counter-productive for significant scientific achievements in nursing. Regardless of the position taken on the relevance of nursing research today and its fate tomorrow, this study will provide empirical evidence about the state of the science. This evidence will stimulate a healthy dialectic regarding the most appropriate goals and strategies for future research in nursing.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:14:53Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:14:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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