The Effectiveness of a Health Informatics Intervention for First-Time Fathers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154751
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effectiveness of a Health Informatics Intervention for First-Time Fathers
Abstract:
The Effectiveness of a Health Informatics Intervention for First-Time Fathers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Hudson, Diane
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Associate Professor
OBECTIVE: The objective of this pilot study was to test the effectiveness of a health informatics intervention, the New Fathers Network, in improving first-time fathers' parenting self-efficacy and parenting satisfaction during the first eight weeks following their infants' birth as compared to no intervention other than the usual parenting information afforded new fathers. DESIGN: A quasi-experimental design was used in this study. POPULATION: A convenience sample of 34 Midwestern USA first-time fathers was recruited from the postpartum unit following their infants' birth and prior to the discharge of mothers and infants to their homes (Intervention Group, n=14), and from a primary care practice during the ninth month of their partner's pregnancy (Comparison Group, n=20). CONCEPTS: Parenting self-efficacy, parenting satisfaction, and health informatics intervention were the concepts in this study. METHOD: Fathers who had convenient Internet access (i.e., home or work) were eligible to participate in the study. Participants completed the Infant Care Survey (Froman & Owen, 1989) and the Evaluation Subscale of the What Being the Parent of a Baby is Like - Revised (Pridham & Chang, 1989) at 4 and 8 weeks following their infants' birth. Fathers in the Intervention Group were instructed to use the New Fathers Network for at least 20 minutes per week while they participated in the study. FINDINGS: Paired sample t-tests found that parenting self-efficacy and parenting satisfaction scores for fathers in the Intervention Group significantly improved from 4 to 8 weeks following their infants' birth, whereas parenting self-efficacy and parenting satisfaction scores for fathers in the Comparison Group did not significantly change. CONCLUSIONS: Fathers were primarily satisfied with the New Fathers Network, and the health informatics intervention served as a mechanism for providing social support and parenting education to fathers.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effectiveness of a Health Informatics Intervention for First-Time Fathersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154751-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effectiveness of a Health Informatics Intervention for First-Time Fathers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hudson, Diane</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dbrage@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBECTIVE: The objective of this pilot study was to test the effectiveness of a health informatics intervention, the New Fathers Network, in improving first-time fathers' parenting self-efficacy and parenting satisfaction during the first eight weeks following their infants' birth as compared to no intervention other than the usual parenting information afforded new fathers. DESIGN: A quasi-experimental design was used in this study. POPULATION: A convenience sample of 34 Midwestern USA first-time fathers was recruited from the postpartum unit following their infants' birth and prior to the discharge of mothers and infants to their homes (Intervention Group, n=14), and from a primary care practice during the ninth month of their partner's pregnancy (Comparison Group, n=20). CONCEPTS: Parenting self-efficacy, parenting satisfaction, and health informatics intervention were the concepts in this study. METHOD: Fathers who had convenient Internet access (i.e., home or work) were eligible to participate in the study. Participants completed the Infant Care Survey (Froman &amp; Owen, 1989) and the Evaluation Subscale of the What Being the Parent of a Baby is Like - Revised (Pridham &amp; Chang, 1989) at 4 and 8 weeks following their infants' birth. Fathers in the Intervention Group were instructed to use the New Fathers Network for at least 20 minutes per week while they participated in the study. FINDINGS: Paired sample t-tests found that parenting self-efficacy and parenting satisfaction scores for fathers in the Intervention Group significantly improved from 4 to 8 weeks following their infants' birth, whereas parenting self-efficacy and parenting satisfaction scores for fathers in the Comparison Group did not significantly change. CONCLUSIONS: Fathers were primarily satisfied with the New Fathers Network, and the health informatics intervention served as a mechanism for providing social support and parenting education to fathers.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:14:56Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:14:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.